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dc.contributor.authorSilva, Amanda Dechen
dc.contributor.authorRoche, Leslie M
dc.contributor.authorGornish, Elise S
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-06T17:11:42Z
dc.date.available2019-08-06T17:11:42Z
dc.date.issued2019-05
dc.identifier.citationSilva, A. D., Roche, L. M., & Gornish, E. S. (2019). The use of strip-seeding for management of two late-season invasive plants. Heliyon, 5(5), e01772.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2405-8440
dc.identifier.pmid31193533
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.heliyon.2019.e01772
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/633700
dc.description.abstractThe spread and persistence of weedy plants in rangelands highlight the need for refinement of existing management techniques and development of novel strategies to address invasions. Strip-seeding - the strategic seeding of a portion of an invaded area to reduce costs and enhance success - is an underutilized management approach that holds promise for reducing weed dominance in grassland habitats. A strip-seeding experiment was established in 2011 in a California grassland where portions (between 0-100%) of invaded plots were seeded with native grasses. In 2016, we assessed the height, above-ground biomass and flower production of two late-season invasive plants: field bindweed and prickly lettuce. We found significant reductions in plant height and flower production (for both target invasives), and biomass (for field bindweed) in many of the seeded strips compared to the unseeded strips. Smaller seed applications demonstrated similar or better utility for weed control compared to greater seed applications, suggesting that this approach can be effective while reducing labor and materials cost of typical restoration management approaches. We did not find evidence that seeded strips provided invasion resistance to unseeded strips. This is possibly due to the lag in native species dispersal and establishment into contiguous unseeded strips, and suggests that strip-seeding might not provide invasion resistance to unseeded strips on timescales that are relevant to managers. However, this work does suggest that strip-seeding native species that overlap in phenology with target invasives can reduce late-season weed dominance on rangelands.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUSDA-NIFA, Rangeland Research Program [CA-D-PLS-2119-CG]; Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brazilen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherELSEVIER SCI LTDen_US
dc.rightsCopyright ©2019 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd. This is an open access article under the CC BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)en_US
dc.subjectAgricultureen_US
dc.subjectConvolvulus arvensisen_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental scienceen_US
dc.subjectLactuca serriolaen_US
dc.subjectRestorationen_US
dc.titleThe use of strip-seeding for management of two late-season invasive plantsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalHELIYONen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journalen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleHeliyon
refterms.dateFOA2019-08-06T17:11:43Z


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