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dc.contributor.authorVij, Priyanka
dc.contributor.authorChen, Debbie
dc.contributor.authorHsu, Chiu-Hsieh
dc.contributor.authorPandit, Viraj
dc.contributor.authorOmesiete, Pamela
dc.contributor.authorElquza, Emad
dc.contributor.authorScott, Aaron
dc.contributor.authorCruz, Alejandro
dc.contributor.authorNfonsam, Valentine
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-12T23:31:42Z
dc.date.available2019-08-12T23:31:42Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-01
dc.identifier.citationVij P, Chen D, Hsu CH, Pandit V, Omesiete P, Elquza E, Scott A, Cruz A, Nfonsam V. Racial disparities in the incidence of colon cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel disease. J Gastrointest Oncol 2019;10(2):254-258. doi: 10.21037/jgo.2019.01.06en_US
dc.identifier.issn2078-6891
dc.identifier.pmid31032092
dc.identifier.doi10.21037/jgo.2019.01.06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/633799
dc.description.abstractBackground: Studies have explored the relationship between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) [ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD)] and colon cancer (CC). Additionally, racial disparities in the incidence of CC is well known. However, the impact of racial disparity in IBD patients who develop CC remains unclear. The aim of this study is to address the knowledge gap in this particular group of patients. Methods: A retrospective analysis was done using the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) database from 2011. We included patients with IBD over age >= 18 years with a diagnosis of CC. Patients were stratified by race, gender, age, presence of IBD and CC. Statistical analysis was performed to compare the groups. Results: A total of 57,542 patients were included (CD: 36,357, UC: 21,001). Of all patients with and without IBD, advanced age, Black and Asian race conferred an increased risk of developing CC, whereas female gender, Hispanic and Native American race conferred a protective effect. In patients with IBD, advanced age conferred an increased risk for developing CC while female gender conferred a protective effect. In this subset of patients, black race conferred a protective effect. Conclusions: Racial disparity exists in the overall incidence of CC and among patients with IBD who develop CC. Interestingly, black race conferred a protective effect for patients with IBD, contrary to what is seen in the general population. These findings could be attributed to the environmental factors and genetic makeup between racial groups. Further studies are warranted to better understand these disparities.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPIONEER BIOSCIENCE PUBL COen_US
dc.rights© Journal of Gastrointestinal Oncology. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectInflammatory bowel disease (IBD)en_US
dc.subjectcolon cancer (CC)en_US
dc.subjectracial disparityen_US
dc.titleRacial disparities in the incidence of colon cancer in patients with inflammatory bowel diseaseen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Surg, Mel & Enid Zuckerman Coll Publ Hlthen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Biostat & Epidemiol, Mel & Enid Zuckerman Coll Publ Hlthen_US
dc.identifier.journalJOURNAL OF GASTROINTESTINAL ONCOLOGYen_US
dc.description.noteOpen Access Journalen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of gastrointestinal oncology
refterms.dateFOA2019-08-12T23:31:42Z


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