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dc.contributor.authorPace, Thaddeus W W
dc.contributor.authorDodds, Sally E
dc.contributor.authorSikorskii, Alla
dc.contributor.authorBadger, Terry A
dc.contributor.authorSegrin, Chris
dc.contributor.authorNegi, Lobsang Tenzin
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Timothy
dc.contributor.authorCrane, Tracy E
dc.date.accessioned2019-08-21T17:20:31Z
dc.date.available2019-08-21T17:20:31Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-29
dc.identifier.citationPace, T. W., Dodds, S. E., Sikorskii, A., Badger, T. A., Segrin, C., Negi, L. T., ... & Crane, T. E. (2019). Cognitively-Based Compassion Training versus cancer health education to improve health-related quality of life in survivors of solid tumor cancers and their informal caregivers: study protocol for a randomized controlled pilot trial. Trials, 20(1), 247.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1745-6215
dc.identifier.pmid31036091
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13063-019-3320-9
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/633905
dc.description.abstractBackground: Cancer survivors and their informal caregivers (family members, close friends) often experience significant impairments in health-related quality of life (HRQOL), including disruptions in psychological, physical, social, and spiritual well-being both during and after primary cancer treatment. The purpose of this in-progress pilot trial is to determine acceptability and preliminary efficacy (as reflected by effect sizes) of CBCT (R) (Cognitively-Based Compassion Training) compared with a cancer health education (CHE) attention control to improve the primary outcome of depressive symptoms and secondary outcomes of other HRQOL domains (e.g., anxiety, fatigue), biomarkers of inflammation and diurnal cortisol rhythm, and healthcare utilization-related outcomes in both cancer survivors and informal caregivers. Methods: Forty dyads consisting of solid tumor survivors who have completed primary treatments (chemotherapy, radiation, surgery) and their informal caregivers, with at least one dyad member with mild depressive symptoms or anxiety, will be recruited from Tucson, Arizona, USA. Survivor-caregiver dyads will be randomized together to complete either CBCT or CHE. CBCT is a manualized, 8-week, group meditation-based intervention that starts with attention and mindfulness and builds to contemplative practices aimed at cultivating compassion to the self and others. The goal of CBCT is to challenge unexamined assumptions about feelings and behaviors, with a focus on generating spontaneous self-compassion and increased empathic responsiveness and compassion for others. CHE is an 8-week, manualized group intervention that provides cancer-specific education on various topics (e.g., cancer advocacy, survivorship wellness). Patient-reported HRQOL outcomes will be assessed before, immediately after (week 9), and 1month after CBCT or CHE (week 13). At the same time points, stress-related biomarkers of inflammation (e.g., plasma interleukin-6) and saliva cortisol relevant for survivor and informal caregiver wellness and healthcare utilization will be measured. Discussion: If CBCT shows acceptability, a larger trial will be warranted and appropriately powered to formally test the efficacy of this dyadic intervention. Interventions such as CBCT directed toward both survivors and caregivers may eventually fill a gap in supportive oncology care programs to improve HRQOL and healthcare utilization in both dyad members. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT03459781. Prospectively registered on 9 March 2018.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Jack Challem Trust [001]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherBMCen_US
dc.rights© The Author(s). 2019. Open Access. This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.en_US
dc.subjectActive controlen_US
dc.subjectCancer survivorshipen_US
dc.subjectCompassion meditationen_US
dc.subjectCortisolen_US
dc.subjectDyadic interdependenceen_US
dc.subjectHealth-related quality of lifeen_US
dc.subjectInflammationen_US
dc.titleCognitively-Based Compassion Training versus cancer health education to improve health-related quality of life in survivors of solid tumor cancers and their informal caregivers: study protocol for a randomized controlled pilot trialen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Nursing, Div Community & Syst Hlth Scien_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Dept Psychiaten_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Sci, Dept Psycholen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Canc Ctren_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Social & Behav Sci, Dept Communen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Nursing, Div Biobehav Healthscien_US
dc.identifier.journalTRIALSen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journalen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleTrials
refterms.dateFOA2019-08-21T17:20:32Z


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