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dc.contributor.authorMalik, Mustafa N
dc.contributor.authorSaleem, Tabinda
dc.contributor.authorAslam, Shehroz
dc.contributor.authorRiaz, Rida
dc.contributor.authorYousaf, Muhammad Abdullah
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-06T03:31:59Z
dc.date.available2019-09-06T03:31:59Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-24
dc.identifier.citationMalik M N, Saleem T, Aslam S, et al. (April 24, 2019) Cholangiocarcinoma in a Resected Biliary Cyst: Importance of Follow-up. Cureus 11(4): e4532. doi:10.7759/cureus.4532en_US
dc.identifier.issn2168-8184
dc.identifier.doi10.7759/cureus.4532
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/634111
dc.description.abstractBiliary cysts are rare cystic dilatations of the biliary tree. Biliary cysts are positively associated with several significant complications, amongst them, cholangiocarcinoma befalls the most dreadful one. The elevated incidence is 20-30% in the unresected cyst and 0.7% in resected cysts. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan, magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) or a contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CECT) is applied for the initial diagnostic study but the ultimate diagnosis ordinarily requires the tissue biopsy. Currently, the sole curative option involves the complete surgical resection of the lesion, with standard chemotherapy and active radiation applied as an alternative for the unresectable tumors. Despite the curative surgery the percentage of eternal recurrence of the tumor indefinitely persists, and effective post-surgical surveillance is reasonably demanded. We report a case of 29-year-old female with local recurrence of cholangiocarcinoma in a previously resected biliary cyst type I. The curative resection of the choledochal cyst only minimizes the considerable risk of the possible development of future cholangiocarcinoma but it does not completely prevent it. The appropriate follow-up for potential patients who have been typically treated for a biliary cyst is unclear. The lethal course of cholangiocarcinoma is believed due to its slow asymptomatic growing phase. Therefore, to adequately screen for malignancy, periodic imaging along with annual liver tests represents a reasonable approach to prevent the possible development of this appalling complication.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherCUREUS INCen_US
dc.rights© Copyright 2019 Malik et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License CC-BY 3.0., which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.en_US
dc.subjectbiliary cysten_US
dc.subjectcholedochal cysten_US
dc.subjectcholangiocarcinomaen_US
dc.subjectadenocarcinomaen_US
dc.titleCholangiocarcinoma in a Resected Biliary Cyst: Importance of Follow-upen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Internal Meden_US
dc.identifier.journalCUREUSen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journalen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-09-06T03:32:00Z


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