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dc.contributor.advisorGood, Thomas L.
dc.contributor.advisorMcCaslin, Mary
dc.contributor.authorSterzinger, Natasha Kay
dc.creatorSterzinger, Natasha Kay
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-17T02:02:43Z
dc.date.available2019-09-17T02:02:43Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/634313
dc.description.abstractIn 1984, Carl Weick discussed how the scale at which we perceive social problems matters, especially regarding innovative action. He denoted that small wins lead to big wins and that this has long been established in various fields (e.g., business, athletic training, weight loss, addiction recovery, etc.). More recently, the Progress Principle (Amabile & Kramer, 2011) empirically established that indeed small wins increase productivity, joy, and creativity. Educational research and reform (i.e., policy, teacher training, evaluation, etc.) could benefit from the additional knowledge that a ‘small wins’ perspective can provide. Indeed, teachers regularly see, use, and are motivated by small wins: small wins can gain momentum and spread. Small wins are emotional moments often marked by struggle and/or frustration, thus making success rewarding. This exploratory study is the first to establish small wins within education. Importantly, it does so from the perspective of classroom teachers. Collectively, teachers define small wins as ephemeral moments of meaningful success. As experts of their classrooms, teachers have the unique ability to identify, create, and celebrate small wins. Given the increased tensions among educators and politicians (e.g., RedforEd, gun laws), it is important that research, policy, and training learn once again from teachers and recognize that small wins are mighty.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction, presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.subjectcreativity
dc.subjectfederal policy
dc.subjectProgress Principle
dc.subjectsmall wins
dc.subjectsystems thinking
dc.subjectteaching
dc.titleGood Teaching: How Small Wins in the Classroom Can Lead to Big Wins for Education
dc.typetext
dc.typeElectronic Dissertation
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizona
thesis.degree.leveldoctoral
dc.contributor.committeememberBurross, Heidi
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate College
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychology
thesis.degree.nameEd.D.
refterms.dateFOA2019-09-17T02:02:43Z


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