• Seasonal Precipitation and Temperature Data for Selected Arizona Stations

      Green, Christine R.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1964-07-15)
      Annual tabulations of winter (November through April) and summer (May through October) precipitation and temperature for 23 Arizona weather stations have been analyzed in this report. Their relationships are shown and discussed briefly.
    • Seeding of Summer Cumulus Clouds

      Battan, Louis J.; Kassander, A. Richard, Jr.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1959-07-01)
      A description is given of a program of randomized seeding of orographic cumuli over southeastern Arizona. This investigation, started in 1957, is still in progress. The aims have been to learn more about natural cloud processes and to ascertain if airborne silver iodide seedings can modify them. It will be shown that analyses of cloud photographs, radar observations, lightning observations and rainfall data suggest that cloud seeding modified the natural cloud processes. However, the changes observed so far have not been large enough to conclude that effects have positively been established.
    • Separate Component Multiple-Effect Solar Distillation

      Hodges, Carl N.; Thompson, T. Lewis; Groh, John E.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1962-11-01)
      Research concerning a desalting system which utilizes solar energy and separate components for evaporation and condensation has been conducted by The University of Arizona for the Office of Saline Water during the period from April 28 to October 28, 1962. While cost optimization has not been completed, equations have been developed for solar collector performance and specific productivity. Items of equipment, such as heat exchangers, packed towers, spray chambers, etc., have also received careful investigation. A model plant has been constructed and is presently being operated. I
    • Significance of Different Vertical Distributions of Water Vapor In Arid and Humid Regions

      Byers, Horace R.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1957-03-15)
      The vertical distribution of water vapor can be expressed by an index coefficient which provides information about eddy and advective transports in a region or in an air mass. The relationship between evapotranspiration and eddy diffusivity of water vapor can be studied in this way. Striking differences in conditions between the arid Southwest and the remainder of the country are shown.
    • Silver Iodide Seeding and Radar Echoes from Convective Clouds

      Battan, Louis J.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1967-10-15)
      Summer convective clouds over a fairly isolated mountain range over southeastern Arizona were seeded by means of airborne silver iodide generators. The selection of days to be seeded was made according to a randomization scheme involving pairs of days. A 3-cm vertically scanning radar set was used to observe the maximum echo height over the "target" area at 30 minute intervals. The data so obtained were used to examine the effects of the seeding on the vertical extent of the cloud echoes. Although there is a suggestion that the silver iodide nuclei may have initiated precipitation in some clouds and caused small vertical echo growths, the statistical analyses, for the most part, showed that the observed differences could easily have been caused by chance.
    • Some Factors in Tucson Summer Rainfall

      Bryson, Reid A.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1957-05-31)
      This report describes an investigation of several synoptic and airmass factors as they relate to the occurrence and amount of daily rainfall at Tucson, Arizona. Of the variables considered as predictors of rain later the same day, three stand out as useful: total precipitable water, Shownlter Stability Index, and distance south of the last closed contour of the circumpolar vortex at 500 mb. Better than 90 percent correct short-term forecasts appear attainable for occurrence of rain, while about twice as many correct forecasts as might be expected by chance were obtained in forecasting rain amount class.
    • Summer Rainy Days in Arizona

      Green, Christine R.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1963-01-15)
      June through September rainy days for 22 Arizona weather stations with 50 or more years of record are tabulated, graphically presented, and discussed.
    • Survey of Weather Modification in the Soviet Union

      Battan, Louis J.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1973-05-15)
      On the basis of a review of abstracts of articles published mostly since 1969, a summary has been prepared of Soviet research in weather modification. Hail suppression and precipitation stimulation still are major areas of activity in the USSR, but in recent years they have begun to do research on lightning suppression and the use of heat for the dissipation of warm fog in stratus. The articles surveyed show little evidence that Soviet scientists, unlike their American counterparts, are convinced of the value of randomized experiments in the evaluation of cloud seeding hypotheses and there is no evidence in this literature that Soviet scientists have been tackling the modification of large scale weather phenomena.
    • Tables of the Radar Cross Sections of Water Spheres

      Herman, Benjamin M.; Browning, Samuel R.; Battan, Louis J.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1961-12-01)
    • The Annual and Diurnal Variations of Cloud Amounts and Cloud Types at Six Arizona Cities

      Sellers, William D.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1958-09-01)
      The annual and diurnal variations of cloud types and cloud amounts are described for six first-order weather stations in .Arizona. These stations are Flagstaff, Winslow, Prescott, Phoenix, Tucson, and Yuma. Most of the data analysed were obtained on punched-cards from the National Weather Records Center at Asheville, North Carolina. The period of record was from January 1, 1948 through December 31, 1955. This information was supplemented by cloud amount data for the period from July 1, 1956 through March 31, 1958 taken from the supplement to the Local Climatological Data for the six stations. After a brief outline of the terrain features in the vicinity of the stations (section II), the type, quantity, and quality of the data are discussed. Emphasis is put on the homogeneity of the records, both temporally at a single station and spatially from one station to another. In section rv the annual variations of cloud amounts, cloud types, and thunderstorms are described, without any reference to the more detailed diurnal variations, which are discussed later, month by month, in section V. Part of the summary (section VI) is devoted to an investigation of the relation between the average cloud cover and the frequencies of occurrence of both clear and overcast skies at a "typical" .Arizona city.
    • The Annual March of Precipitation in Arizona, New Mexico, and Northwestern Mexico

      Bryson, Reid A.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1957-06-07)
      This report is concerned with the annual march of monthly precipitation amount in an area comprising the states of Arizona, New Mexico, Sonora, Sinaloa, Durango, and western Chihuahua. Fourier analysis was used to reduce the twentyyear mean monthly values to six harmonic terms, four of which were then plotted on charts and studied. The results of this study indicate that an area consisting largely of the Sierra Madre Occidental in northwestern Mexico, and the portion of Arizona southeast of Tucson constitute a single rainfall province with a strong summer maximum of rainfall. This province also has a winter maximum but only in Arizona does the semi-annual term exceed the annual in amplitude. Within the United States the Gila and Rio Grande valleys constitute rainfall provinces of internally similar annual march, while the upland areas tend to resemble the Pacific coastal pattern to the west.
    • The Distribution of Clouds at Tucson, Arizona, with Respect to Type, Amount, and Time of Observation

      DesJardins, Robert B.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1958-01-01)
      More than 25,000 Weather Bureau cloud observations for Tucson, Arizona, for the nine-year period from 1 July 1945 to 1 July 1954, were statistically analyzed. It was immediately obvious from this analysis that the cloud data for this period were not homogeneous. A study of the heterogeneities in the data indicated that they were probably caused by two changes which had been made in the Weather Bureau cloud observing procedures. These changes were: (1) In 1949 the descriptive material for cirrostratus clouds was changed when the revised version of the Manual of Cloud Forms and Codes for States of the Sky was published. !!his change is believed to have caused a large increase in the annual number of observations of cirrostratus clouds and a correspondingly large decrease in the annual number of observations of cirrus clouds. (2) On July 1, 1948 a new procedure for recording cloud observations on WBAN Form lOB was adopted. This new recording procedure resulted in cloud observations which were not as detailed as were the observations made before July 1, 1948. The change from the old "cloud family" recording procedure to the new "cloud layer" recording procedure resulted in a decreased number of recorded observations of cumulonimbus and altostratus clouds. The frequencies of occurrence were computed for eight types of clouds (stratocumulus, cumulus humilis, cumulus congestus, cumulonimbus, altostratus, altocumulus, cirrus and cirrostratus) and the annual and diurnal variations of these frequencies were determined. The average monthly tenths of cloud cover were also computed and the annual and diurnal variations of the amounts of cloud cover were determined. A comparison of the annual variations of these parameters showed that they were essentially the same for six of the cloud types but were notably different for the cumulus humilis and cumulus congestus cloud types. The annual variations of the frequencies of occurrence of the most common cloud types were also compared to the annual variations of three synoptic parameters (the number of frontal passages, the amount of precipitation and the amount of precipitable water). These comparisons seemed to indicate that there was a relationship between the general synoptic situation and the amount of cloudiness during some months. However, the number of synoptic parameters included in this part of the study need to be increased before any definite conclusions can be reached. For each month, the year-to-year variations in the amounts of high, middle and low cloudiness at Tucson were compared with the year-to-year variations of the average amount of precipitation for the Tucson area. In general, changes in the amount of cloudiness were of the same sign as changes in the amount of precipitation, but there were many noteworthy exceptions to this general pattern. In addition, the rank correlations -2- between the monthly amounts of precipitation and the monthly amounts of cloudiness were computed. In general, the precipitation was best correlated with the amount of low cloudiness and the highest of these correlations occurred during the winter months. However, there were many interesting deviations from this general pattern.
    • The Low-Level Wind Field at Phoenix and Tucson

      Frenzel, Carroll W.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1961-10-02)
      Resultant surface winds presented as monthly averages for each hour of the day for two years have been computed for Tucson and Phoenix and are displayed as hodographs showing the diurnal variation of the surface wind. Resultant winds for these two years were computed from upper air observations for all times and all levels of observation up to and including 4000 meters above mean sea level for both Phoenix and Tucson, and are presented in the form of tabulated listings as monthly averages. In addition, mean speeds of the upper air winds are presented and a tabulation of the occurrence of calm winds at the surface vs. month and hour is given. Results of this study show that a distinct diurnal variation in the surface winds is present at both Tucson and Phoenix. The most persistent feature of the wind field at both of these stations is the drainage wind which occurs during the early morning hours. During the warmer portions of the day air motion tends to be toward higher elevations. Thus, in general, the air motion conforms to what is expected on the basis of theory. Mean air motion for each month is presented. Considerable difference between months and between the same months of the two years is noted. High frequencies of reported calms at Phoenix for certain months lead to rather small net air movement. The diurnal variation in the number of reported calms is seen to be related to the diurnal reversal in wind direction associated with the mountain-valley circulation. The relationship of these resultant winds to the air pollution problem at these two cities is discussed.
    • The Role of Precipitable Water Vapor in Arizona's Summer Rains

      Reitan, Clayton H.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1957-01-31)
      The relation between Arizona's summer rains and the amount of water vapor in the air over Arizona was examined. It was found that the occurrence of rain was primarily determined by the moisture content of the air over the state, defined in this study by the amount of precipitable water at Phoenix. The effects of vertical wind shear and stability on the occurrence of rain were examined, but could not be precisely determined and are probably small as compared with the effects of precipitable water. Precipitation efficiency was found to vary directly with variations in the amount of precipitable water, but could be explained by changes in the evaporation of raindrops between cloud bases and ground in environments of differing precipitable water contents.
    • University of Arizona, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Progress Report No. 1

      Braham, Roscoe R., Jr.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1954-10-01)
    • University of Arizona, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Progress Report No. 2

      Braham, Roscoe R., Jr.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1955-11-30)
    • University of Arizona, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Progress Report No. 3

      Braham, Roscoe R., Jr.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1956-06-15)
    • University of Arizona, Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Progress Report No. 4

      Kassander, A. Richard, Jr.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1957-06-15)
    • Variability of Precipitation in an Arid Region: A Survey of Characteristics for Arizona

      McDonald, James E.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1956-12-31)
      A number of statistical and meteorological aspects of the temporal and spatial variability of precipitation in Arizona have been examined in terms of their bearing on the water resources of the arid southwestern United States. Most of the work summerized has been of the nature of initial exploratory investigations made in order to lay the foundation for the much more extensive studies that will shortly be begun as part of the University of Arizona-U.S. Weather Bureau Cooperative Punchcard Climatological program. A selected sample of long-record Weather Bureau precipitation stations in Arizona were analyzed for their historic variability properties, a number of statistical and calculational techniques were tested, and a general plan has been developed for the next phases of the Institute's variability program. It is believed that these findings will be of interest not only to investigators in arid regions themselves but also to investigators chiefly concerned with more humid areas; for, in many respects, the statistical characteristics of arid-lands precipitation pose the most stringent of all requirements on statistical methodology. In that sense, the quantitative results of the present report may serve as useful indicators of upper bounds on the effects of non-normality, skewness, and heteroscedasticity of precipitation frequency distributions for North America in general.
    • Wind Gradients and Variance of Doppler Spectra

      Battan, Louis J.; Theiss, John B.; Institute of Atmospheric Physics, The University of Arizona (Institute of Atmospheric Physics, University of Arizona (Tucson, AZ), 1971-12-15)
      An X-band pulsed-Doppler radar having its beam fixed at an elevation angle of 3 deg, was used to measure radial velocity spectra in a light shower. Observations were made at intervals of 152 m between radar ranges of 7 and 18 km. It was found that the mean Doppler velocity, variance of the Doppler spectrum and radar reflectivity varied markedly over distances of the order of 100 m. The observed variance was below about 1 m2 sec-2 in 80 percent of the observations, but in about 4 percent of the cases, it exceeded 3m2 sec-2. An analysis of ~V/~r, the radial gradient of the mean Doppler velocity yielded a nearly Gaussian curve having a mean of 0.2 x 10-3 sec-1 and a standard deviation of 5.9 x 10-3 sec-1. The largest value observed was 3 X 10- 2 sec-1. The effects of the radial gradient of the radial wind apparently can explain about 25 percent of the observed variance of the Doppler spectrum.