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dc.contributor.authorSmith, Alyssa Laney
dc.contributor.authorAtwater, Daniel Z
dc.contributor.authorCallaway, Ragan M
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-09T18:54:26Z
dc.date.available2019-10-09T18:54:26Z
dc.date.issued2019-04-14
dc.identifier.citationAlyssa Laney Smith, Daniel Z. Atwater, and Ragan M. Callaway, "Early Sibling Conflict May Ultimately Benefit the Family," The American Naturalist 194, no. 4 (October 2019): 482-487.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0003-0147
dc.identifier.pmid31490727
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/704773
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/634704
dc.description.abstractRelatives often interact differently with each other than with nonrelatives, and whether kin cooperate or compete has important consequences for the evolution of mating systems, seed size, dispersal, and competition. Previous research found that the larger of the size dimorphic seeds produced by the annual plant Aegilops triuncialis suppressed germination of their smaller sibs by 25%-60%. Here, we found evidence for kin recognition and sibling rivalry later in life among Aegilops seedlings that places seed-seed interactions in a broader context. In experiments with size dimorphic seeds, seedlings reduced the growth of sibling seedlings by ∼40% but that of nonsibling seedlings by ∼25%. These sequential antagonistic interactions between seeds and then seedlings provide insight into conflict and cooperation among kin. Kin-based conflict among seeds may maintain dormancy for some seeds until the coast is clear of more competitive siblings. If so, biotically induced seed dormancy may be a unique form of cooperation, which increases the inclusive fitness of maternal plants and offspring by minimizing competition among kin.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation (NSF)National Science Foundation (NSF) [OIA-1757351]; NSFNational Science Foundation (NSF) [DGE-1143953]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUNIV CHICAGO PRESSen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectasymmetryen_US
dc.subjectcompetitionen_US
dc.subjectcooperationen_US
dc.subjectexotic invasiveen_US
dc.subjectintraspecific variationen_US
dc.subjectkin selectionen_US
dc.subjectplant-plant interactionsen_US
dc.titleEarly Sibling Conflict May Ultimately Benefit the Familyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biolen_US
dc.identifier.journalAMERICAN NATURALISTen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published online: 14 August 2019en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleThe American naturalist


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