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dc.contributor.authorBehroozi, Peter
dc.contributor.authorWechsler, Risa H
dc.contributor.authorHearin, Andrew P
dc.contributor.authorConroy, Charlie
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-09T19:38:41Z
dc.date.available2019-10-09T19:38:41Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-02
dc.identifier.citationPeter Behroozi, Risa H Wechsler, Andrew P Hearin, Charlie Conroy, UniverseMachine: The correlation between galaxy growth and dark matter halo assembly from z = 0−10, Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, Volume 488, Issue 3, September 2019, Pages 3143–3194, https://doi.org/10.1093/mnras/stz1182en_US
dc.identifier.issn0035-8711
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/mnras/stz1182
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/634717
dc.description.abstractWe present a method to flexibly and self-consistently determine individual galaxies’ star formation rates (SFRs) from their host haloes’ potential well depths, assembly histories, and redshifts. The method is constrained by galaxies’ observed stellar mass functions, SFRs (specific and cosmic), quenched fractions, ultraviolet (UV) luminosity functions, UV–stellar mass relations, IRX–UV relations, auto- and cross-correlation functions (including quenched and star-forming subsamples), and quenching dependence on environment; each observable is reproduced over the full redshift range available, up to 0 < z < 10. Key findings include the following: galaxy assembly correlates strongly with halo assembly; quenching correlates strongly with halo mass; quenched fractions at fixed halo mass decrease with increasing redshift; massive quenched galaxies reside in higher-mass haloes than star-forming galaxies at fixed galaxy mass; star-forming and quenched galaxies’ star formation histories at fixed mass differ most at z < 0.5; satellites have large scatter in quenching time-scales after infall, and have modestly higher quenched fractions than central galaxies; Planck cosmologies result in up to 0.3 dex lower stellar – halo mass ratios at early times; and, none the less, stellar mass–halo mass ratios rise at z > 5. Also presented are revised stellar mass – halo mass relations for all, quenched, star-forming, central, and satellite galaxies; the dependence of star formation histories on halo mass, stellar mass, and galaxy SSFR; quenched fractions and quenching time-scale distributions for satellites; and predictions for higher-redshift galaxy correlation functions and weak lensing surface densities. The public data release (DR1) includes the massively parallel (>10 5 cores) implementation (the UniverseMachine), the newly compiled and remeasured observational data, derived galaxy formation constraints, and mock catalogues including lightcones.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipGiacconi Fellowship from the Space Telescope Science Institute; NASA through a Hubble Fellowship grant from the Space Telescope Science Institute [HST-HF2-51353.001-A]; NASANational Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) [NAS5-26555]; NSFNational Science Foundation (NSF) [1066293]; National Science Foundation (NSF)National Science Foundation (NSF) [PHY11-25915]; Munich Institute for Astro-and Particle Physics (MIAPP) of the DFG cluster of excellence 'Origin and Structure of the Universe; Office of Science of the U.S. Department of EnergyUnited States Department of Energy (DOE) [DE-AC02-05CH11231]; DOEUnited States Department of Energy (DOE) [DE-AC02-76SF00515]; NASA High-EndComputing (HEC) Program through the NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) Division at Ames Research Center; PRACE [012060963]; Alfred P. Sloan FoundationAlfred P. Sloan Foundation; U.S. Department of Energy Office of ScienceUnited States Department of Energy (DOE); University of Arizona; Brazilian Participation Group; Brookhaven National LaboratoryUnited States Department of Energy (DOE); Carnegie Mellon University; French Participation Group; German Participation Group; Harvard University; Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias; Michigan State/Notre Dame/JINA Participation Group; Johns Hopkins UniversityJohns Hopkins University; Lawrence Berkeley National LaboratoryUnited States Department of Energy (DOE); Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics; Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics; Pennsylvania State University; Princeton UniversityPrinceton University; Spanish Participation Group; Yale University; University of FloridaUniversity of Florida; NewMexico State University; New York University; Ohio State UniversityOhio State University; University of Portsmouth; University of Tokyo; University of Utah; Vanderbilt University; University of Virginia; University of WashingtonUniversity of Washingtonen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherOXFORD UNIV PRESSen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 The Author(s) Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Royal Astronomical Society.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectgalaxies: formationen_US
dc.subjectgalaxies: haloesen_US
dc.titleUniverseMachine: The correlation between galaxy growth and dark matter halo assembly from z = 0−10en_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Astronen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Steward Observen_US
dc.identifier.journalMONTHLY NOTICES OF THE ROYAL ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETYen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.volume488
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage3143-3194
refterms.dateFOA2019-10-09T19:38:42Z


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