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dc.contributor.authorTarbell, Mark
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-21T19:54:31Z
dc.date.available2019-10-21T19:54:31Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-13
dc.identifier.citationMark A. Tarbell "AI and the transcendence of true autonomy", Proc. SPIE 10982, Micro- and Nanotechnology Sensors, Systems, and Applications XI, 1098223 (13 May 2019); https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2517403en_US
dc.identifier.issn0277-786X
dc.identifier.doi10.1117/12.2517403
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/634781
dc.description.abstractFor more than sixty years, the "Holy Grail" of computer science has been to build an intelligent, autonomous system, one that is self-aware and capable of rational thought. The founders of Artificial Intelligence recently gave a grim assessment of their field: AI and neuroscience are fixated on the details of implementation, without a fundamental architecture in sight.(1) No one has ever articulated the design for an autonomous system, so how can one be built? Modern AI/AGI efforts attempt to achieve this goal through elaborate rules-based computation and biology-inspired computing topologies, while actively ignoring the need for a fundamental architecture. This publication introduces a novel architecture and fundamental operating theory behind true autonomy, breaking with the standard principles of AI the very principles that have kept AI from achieving its own goals.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSPIE-INT SOC OPTICAL ENGINEERINGen_US
dc.rights© 2019 SPIEen_US
dc.subjectAutonomous systemsen_US
dc.subjectAI/AGIen_US
dc.subjectautonomyen_US
dc.subjectarchitecture of thoughten_US
dc.subjectnon-determinismen_US
dc.subjectmind vs. brainen_US
dc.titleAI and the transcendence of true autonomyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Engn, Visual & Autonomous Explorat Syst Res Laben_US
dc.identifier.journalMICRO- AND NANOTECHNOLOGY SENSORS, SYSTEMS, AND APPLICATIONS XIen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-10-21T19:54:31Z


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