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dc.contributor.authorRodríguez-Estrella, Ricardo
dc.contributor.authorRivera-Rodríguez, Laura B.
dc.date.accessioned2019-10-23T20:07:07Z
dc.date.available2019-10-23T20:07:07Z
dc.date.issued2019-05-09
dc.identifier.citationRicardo Rodríguez-Estrella and Laura B. Rivera-Rodríguez "High Prevalence of Louse Flies on Osprey Nestlings in a Baja California Colony," Journal of Raptor Research 53(2), 142-149, (9 May 2019). https://doi.org/10.3356/JRR-17-59en_US
dc.identifier.issn0892-1016
dc.identifier.doi10.3356/jrr-17-59
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/634800
dc.description.abstractWe studied the prevalence of a louse fly (Olfersia fumipennis) in a dense breeding colony of Ospreys (Pandion haliaetus) at San Ignacio Lagoon, Baja California Sur, Mexico. We determined fly prevalence and infestation intensity of 45 nestlings (age 32–59 d). We found louse flies in 65% of the nests sampled (n = 34). Louse fly prevalence in nestlings (n = 45) was 56%, the highest rate reported for any raptor species. Male and female nestlings showed similar levels of fly prevalence and infestation, possibly because the numbers of each sex in this population were similar. We found that louse flies had a spatially dispersed distribution, such that the proximity of any nest to any other within the colony did not influence the prevalence of louse flies nor the louse fly load. The productivity of nests with parasitized young (1.3 ± 0.5 young/nest) was similar to that of nests with young that were not parasitized (1.4 ± 0.6 young/nest; P > 0.05). In terms of spatial location, the overall productivity (number of young per successful nest) of the colony was affected by louse fly prevalence. The condition of coloniality (i.e., high density of nests) likely caused high overall louse fly prevalence. A high prevalence of parasitism might be part of the cost of nesting in colonial conditions. Additional studies on the prevalence of louse flies and the health and body condition of nestlings are needed to evaluate the health of Osprey populations.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCIBNOR; Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologia [SEMARNAT-CONACyT C01-0318, SEMARNAT-CONACyT 0023861, SEP-CONACyT 45737, SEP-CONACyT 155956]; CONACyT; Universidad Autonoma de Sinaloaen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherRAPTOR RESEARCH FOUNDATION INCen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 The Raptor Research Foundation, Inc.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectOspreyen_US
dc.subjectPandion haliaetusen_US
dc.subjectlouse flyen_US
dc.subjectOlfersia fumipennisen_US
dc.subjectBaja Californiaen_US
dc.subjectinfestationen_US
dc.subjectMexicoen_US
dc.subjectparasiteen_US
dc.subjectreproductive rateen_US
dc.subjectsex ratioen_US
dc.titleHigh Prevalence of Louse Flies on Osprey Nestlings in a Baja California Colonyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Nat Resources & Environmen_US
dc.identifier.journalJOURNAL OF RAPTOR RESEARCHen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.volume53
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage142
refterms.dateFOA2019-10-23T20:07:08Z


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