Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPryor, Cori
dc.contributor.authorBoman, John H.
dc.contributor.authorMowen, Thomas J.
dc.contributor.authorMcCamman, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-07T01:09:53Z
dc.date.available2019-11-07T01:09:53Z
dc.date.issued2019-07-27
dc.identifier.citationPryor, C., Boman IV, J. H., Mowen, T. J., & McCamman, M. (2019). A national study of sustained use of force complaints in law enforcement agencies. Journal of Criminal Justice, 64, 101623.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0047-2352
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jcrimjus.2019.101623
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/634969
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This article examines how community and departmental characteristics relate to the number of sustained use of force complaints in a law enforcement agency. Methods: Using national-level data from Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics 2007, Uniform Crime Reports 2007, American Community Survey 2009 and bivariate and multivariate techniques, we investigate whether sustained uses of force vary across 1) community and regional characteristics in the U.S. and across departmental 2) policies, 3) training tendencies, and 4) hiring practices. Results: Controlling for region, crime rate, and area median income, results demonstrate that sustained complaints increase when departments serve large, nonwhite populations. Regarding departmental policies, results are alarming: Departments with independent civilian complaint review boards, agencies which engage in community policing, and departments that implement personality tests when hiring sustain significantly higher numbers of use of force complaints. However, departments that screen for volunteer and community service histories in officer candidates have over one third fewer sustained complaints than departments that do not use this hiring screen. Conclusions: In order to significantly reduce the amount of sustained complaints against a department, results suggest that agencies should assess community service and volunteer histories for potential officer candidates.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCenter for Family and Demographic Research, Bowling Green State University; Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human DevelopmentUnited States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USANIH Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development (NICHD) [P2CHD050959]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherELSEVIERen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectCitizen complaintsen_US
dc.subjectSustained complaintsen_US
dc.subjectUse of forceen_US
dc.subjectPolice-community relationsen_US
dc.subjectCommunity policingen_US
dc.subjectProcedural justiceen_US
dc.titleA national study of sustained use of force complaints in law enforcement agenciesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalJOURNAL OF CRIMINAL JUSTICEen_US
dc.description.note24 month embargo; published online: 27 July 2019en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.volume64
dc.source.beginpage101623


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
ForArizonaLibrary.pdf
Size:
319.6Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Accepted Manuscript

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record