Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorRodriguez, J A P
dc.contributor.authorBaker, V R
dc.contributor.authorLiu, T
dc.contributor.authorZarroca, M
dc.contributor.authorTravis, B
dc.contributor.authorHui, T
dc.contributor.authorKomatsu, G
dc.contributor.authorBerman, D C
dc.contributor.authorLinares, R
dc.contributor.authorSykes, M V
dc.contributor.authorBanks, M E
dc.contributor.authorKargel, J S
dc.date.accessioned2019-11-07T01:40:20Z
dc.date.available2019-11-07T01:40:20Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-25
dc.identifier.citationRodriguez, J.A.P., Baker, V.R., Liu, T. et al. The 1997 Mars Pathfinder Spacecraft Landing Site: Spillover Deposits from an Early Mars Inland Sea. Sci Rep 9, 4045 (2019) doi:10.1038/s41598-019-39632-1en_US
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.pmid30837500
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41598-019-39632-1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/634976
dc.description.abstractThe Martian outflow channels comprise some of the largest known channels in the Solar System. Remote-sensing investigations indicate that cataclysmic floods likely excavated the channels ~3.4 Ga. Previous studies show that, in the southern circum-Chryse region, their flooding pathways include hundreds of kilometers of channel floors with upward gradients. However, the impact of the reversed channel-floor topography on the cataclysmic floods remains uncertain. Here, we show that these channel floors occur within a vast basin, which separates the downstream reaches of numerous outflow channels from the northern plains. Consequently, floods propagating through these channels must have ponded, producing an inland sea, before reaching the northern plains as enormous spillover discharges. The resulting paleohydrological reconstruction reinterprets the 1997 Pathfinder landing site as part of a marine spillway, which connected the inland sea to a hypothesized northern plains ocean. Our flood simulation shows that the presence of the sea would have permitted the propagation of low-depth floods beyond the areas of reversed channel-floor topography. These results explain the formation at the landing site of possible fluvial features indicative of flow depths at least an order of magnitude lower than those apparent from the analyses of orbital remote-sensing observations.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherNATURE PUBLISHING GROUPen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © The Author(s) 2019. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleThe 1997 Mars Pathfinder Spacecraft Landing Site: Spillover Deposits from an Early Mars Inland Seaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Hydrol & Atmospher Scien_US
dc.identifier.journalSCIENTIFIC REPORTSen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journalen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleScientific reports
refterms.dateFOA2019-11-07T01:40:21Z


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
s41598-019-39632-1.pdf
Size:
2.483Mb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Published Version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Copyright © The Author(s) 2019. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © The Author(s) 2019. Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.