• 10 Steps to Evaluate Rangeland Riparian Health

      Fleming, William; Galt, Dee; Holechek, Jerry (Society for Range Management, 2001-12-01)
    • 14 Years of Rabbitbrush Control in Central Oregon

      Mohan, J. M. (Society for Range Management, 1973-11-01)
      Fourteen years (1956 to 1970) of chemical control for rubber and green rabbitbrush using the ester forms of 2,4-D produced consistent control, ranging from 85 to 98% on rubber rabbitbrush. The amount of new twig growth, soil moisture, rate and methods of application, total seasonal twig growth, and subsequent drought conditions proved critical for effective kills. Selective kills were achieved by manipulation of these factors. Site potential and response to changes that result from chemical control must be recognized. "Drainage Effect" is a complex of thermal drafts, topography, and soil differences that can adversely influence the percentage of rabbitbrush control achieved.
    • 14- Vs. 42-Paddock Rotational Grazing: Aboveground Biomass Dynamics, Forage Production, and Harvest Efficiency

      Heitschmidt, R. K.; Dowhower, S. L.; Walker, J. W. (Society for Range Management, 1987-05-01)
      Research was initiated at the Texas Experimental Ranch in 1981 to quantify the effects of 2 stocking densities, equivalent to 14- and 42-paddock rotational grazing (RG) treatments, on aboveground biomass dynamics, aboveground net primary production (ANPP), and harvest efficiency of forage. Baseline data were collected in 1981 from 3 adjacent 30-ha paddocks in a 14-paddock, cell designed RG treatment. Near the beginning of the 1982 growing season the center paddock was subdivided into three, 10-ha paddocks to establish the RG-42 treatment. Stocking densities in the 14- and 42-paddock treatments were 4.2 and 12.5 AU/ha, respectively, from March 1982 to June 1984 and 3.0 and 9.1 AU/ha from June to November 1984. During 1981, estimated ANPP in the two RG-14 paddocks averaged 4,088 kg/ha as compared to 5,762 in the single RG-42 paddock. Following subdivision, ANPP in the RG-14 paddocks averaged 2,533 kg/ha as compared to 2,670 kg/ha in the RG-42 paddocks. Although ANPP varied significantly among the 4 years of the study it was not affected by density treatment. Likewise, harvest efficiency varied among years but was unaffected by density treatment. Average harvest efficiency over the 4 years was about 42%. Aboveground biomass dynamics were also generally unaffected by density treatments.
    • 14- Vs. 42-Paddock Rotational Grazing: Forage Quality

      Heitschmidt, R. K.; Dowhower, S. L.; Walker, J. W. (Society for Range Management, 1987-07-01)
      Research was initiated at the Texas Experimental Ranch in 1981 to quantify the effects of 2 livestock densities on forage quality in a rotational grazing (RG) treatment. Livestock densities evaluated were equivalent to 14 and 42-paddock RG treatments. Baseline data were collected in 1981 from 3 adjacent 30-ha paddocks in a 465-ha, 14-paddock, cell designed RG treatment stocked at a rate of 3.6 ha/cow/year. Near the beginning of the 1982 growing season the center paddock was subdivided into three, 10-ha paddocks to establish the RG-42 treatment. Herbage standing crop was harvested before and after each grazing event during the 40-month period, separated by species or species group into live and dead tissue, and each fraction analyzed for percentage crude protein (CP) and organic matter digestibility (OMD). Livestock density had minimial effect on forage quality. Live tissue was of higher quality than senesced tissue regardless of plant species. Increases and decreases in overall quality during grazing periods were positively associated with rates of plant growth. Number of periods when forage quality increased or decreased during grazing and magnitude of change were unaffected by treatment. Lack of significant treatment effects on forage quality is attributed to the general absence of significant treatment effects on forage production, species composition, and live/dead ratios.
    • 1990 President's Address: SRM Today and Tomorrow

      Bedell, Thomas E. (Society for Range Management, 1990-03-01)
    • 1993 International Symposium on Grassland Resources, Huhehot, Peoples Republic of China

      Frisina, Michael R. (Society for Range Management, 1994-04-01)
    • 1994 High School Youth Forum – A Report

      Francis, Mark G. (Society for Range Management, 1994-10-01)
    • 2005 Plenary Session Will Be Enlightening and Entertaining

      Humphries, Ellen (Society for Range Management, 2004-12-01)
    • 2008 Rangeland Cup

      Mealor, Brian; Mealor, Rachel (Society for Range Management, 2008-12-01)
    • 2008 SRM High School Youth Forum Paper Presentations

      Rector, Barron S. (Society for Range Management, 2008-08-01)
    • 2008 SRM Rangeland Job Fair

      Society for Range Management, 2007-08-01
    • 24 Tips on Speaking for the Extension Worker

      Fenley, John M.; Williams, Saudiq Kolawole Taiwo (Society for Range Management, 1979-06-01)
    • 30 Years Of Medusahead: Return To Fly Blown Flat

      Wagner, Joseph A.; Delmas, Richard E.; Young, James A. (Society for Range Management, 2001-06-01)
    • 30 Years of Vegetal Change Following Burning of Sagebrush-Grass Range

      Harniss, R. O.; Murray, R. B. (Society for Range Management, 1973-09-01)
      A sagebrush-grass range was burned according to plan in 1936. Long-term results show that sagebrush yields have increased while most other important shrub, grass, and forb yields have decreased. Evaluation by subspecies of sagebrush was helpful in interpreting sagebrush behavior. The return of sagebrush shows the need for planning sagebrush control on a continuing basis for maximum forage qualities.
    • 44th Annual Meeting of the National Wildlife Federation

      Kimball, Thomas L. (Society for Range Management, 1980-10-01)
    • 48 Reasons Why Land and Water Resources Are Being Neglected

      Pederson, Oscar; Wirak, Joe (Society for Range Management, 1980-08-01)
    • 65th Annual SRM Meeting, February 2012, Spokane, Washington

      Buckhouse, John (Society for Range Management, 2011-04-01)
    • A "grass-roots" effort for the future

      Gordon, Kindra (Society for Range Management, 2003-04-01)