• Current and Future Progress of the Range Society

      Renner, F. G. (Society for Range Management, 1950-04-01)
    • Current Knowledge of the Effects of Cattle Grazing on Aspen in the Alberta Parkland

      Jones, Keith L. (Society for Range Management, 1983-04-01)
    • Current Literature

      Darrow, Robert A. (Society for Range Management, 1948-10-01)
    • Current Literature

      Darrow, Robert A. (Society for Range Management, 1949-07-01)
    • Current Literature

      Darrow, Robert A. (Society for Range Management, 1949-10-01)
    • Current Literature

      Harris, Grant A. (Society for Range Management, 1950-07-01)
    • Current Literature

      Darrow, Robert A. (Society for Range Management, 1950-01-01)
    • Current Literature

      Harris, Grant A. (Society for Range Management, 1950-04-01)
    • Current Literature

      Darrow, Robert A. (Society for Range Management, 1949-04-01)
    • Current Literature

      Darrow, Robert A. (Society for Range Management, 1949-01-01)
    • Current Literature of Range Management

      Society for Range Management, 1980-06-01
    • Current Literature of Range Management

      Society for Range Management, 1982-08-01
    • Current Literature of Range Management

      Society for Range Management, 1982-04-01
    • Current Literature of Range Management

      Society for Range Management, 1982-12-01
    • Current Literature of Range Management

      Society for Range Management, 1982-10-01
    • Cutting frequency and cutting height effects on rough fescue and parry oat grass yields

      Willms, W. D. (Society for Range Management, 1991-01-01)
      A study was made in the Rough Fescue Grasslands of southwestern Alberta to determine the yield response of rough fescue (Festuca scabrella var campestris Rydb.) and Parry oat grass (Danthonia parryi Scribn.) to 5 cutting frequencies and 3 heights over a 1-year period. The same plants were cut either 1, 2, 4, 8, or 16 times over a 16-week period beginning in mid-May, at 16-, 8-, 4-, 2-, or 1-week intervals, respectively, and at heights of either 5, 10, or 15 cm above ground level. Yield response to cutting treatments differed significantly from the flrst to the third treatment year. In the first year, rough fescue and Parry oat grass produced most forage when cut at a height of 5 cm with 1, 2, or 4 cuts. By the third year, rough fescue produced the greatest yields with a single cut after 16 weeks and Parry oat grass produced the greatest yields when cut at 10 or 15 cm at 1-week intervals. The data confirm the high sensitivity of rough fescue to grazing while the plant is growing and suggest that the greatest benefit from the Rough Fescue Grasslands may be derived by grazing in fall or winter. Summer grazing favors Parry oatgrass, which is more tolerant than rough fescue, but forage production on the grassland is reduced.
    • Cutting height effects on wetland meadow forage yield and quality

      Dovel, R. L. (Society for Range Management, 1996-03-01)
      Research was conducted to determine the effect of clipping height on forage yield and quality of 3 wetland meadow plant associations. Bluegrass-clover (Poa spp. and Trifolium spp.), grass-sedge (Poa spp., Deschampsia caespitosa, and Carex spp.), and sedge (Carex spp.) associations were cut to stubble heights of 5, 10, or 15 cm in 1988, 1989, and 1990. Forage yield, herbage residue, crude protein (CP), and acid detergent fiber (ADF) were determined for forage harvested in June, July, and August. Forage yields of all associations increased as clipping height decreased. The majority of total forage produced for all associations was harvested in the June clipping. Herbage residue exceeded 1.4 Mg ha-1 for all clipping heights, dates, and associations. Average CP concentration of the bluegrass-clover, grass-sedge, and sedge associations was 12.1, 13.3, and 10.8%, respectively. The CP concentration of the 2 grass-dominated associations increased with decreasing clipping height, but clipping height effect on sedge association CP was not consistent across the growing season. Clipping date had a greater effect on forage CP concentration than did clipping height. Crude protein concentration of all associations increased from the June clipping date to the July clipping date and declined in August. Clipping height did not significantly affect ADF of the bluegrass-clover or grass-sedge associations. Sedge ADF decreased with increasing clipping height in the first clipping, but increased with increasing clipping height in the second and third clippings. Bluegrass-clover ADF increased in a linear fashion from 30.9% at the June clipping date to 36.1% at the August clipping date. In contrast, both the grass-sedge and sedge associations showed curvilinear responses to clipping date, increasing from June to July and then declining in August.
    • Cutting Ranching Costs: Optimizing Forage Protein Value

      Ricketts, Matt (Society for Range Management, 1994-12-01)
    • Cyanogenic Glycoside Levels in Saskatoon Serviceberry

      Majak, W.; Quinton, D. A.; Broersma, K. (Society for Range Management, 1980-05-01)
      The concentration of prunasin, the cyanogenic glycoside in Saskatoon serviceberry, was determined in leaves and twigs over a 12-month period. Eight shrubs were monitored, three of which were located in the ponderosa pine zone and the remainder in the Douglasfir zone. Qualitative tests indicated that the cyanide potential of serviceberry persisted continuously at all the experimental sites in both leaves and twigs. Quantitative analyses showed that prunasin levels in twigs were substantially higher in current year's growth as compared to previous year's growth. The highest prunasin levels were obtained in new growth of leaves and twigs following initiation and and this potentially hazardous period for browsers is described. Shrubs yielded lower prunasin levels when they were associated with ground water indicator species.
    • Cytokinins Effect on Protein and Chlorophyll Content of Big Bluestem Leaves

      Towne, G.; Owensby, C. (Society for Range Management, 1983-01-01)
      Four concentrations of the synthetic cytokinin benzyladenine (BA) were applied to ungrazed tallgrass prairie near Manhattan, Kans., in 1979 on 4 biweekly dates beginning in mid-June. Changes in chlorophyll and crude protein content of big bluestem (Andropogon gerardi Vitman) leaves from the different treatments were monitored weekly from August until early October. BA did not significantly delay chlorophyll breakdown in big bluestem, but leaves sprayed with 5 ppm BA contained higher mean chlorophyll contents throughout the sampling period than leaves from other treatments. Big bluestem receiving 5, 20, and 40 ppm BA applied in July had significantly more crude protein than untreated leaves, but 10 ppm BA had no effect on leaf protein content. Applying BA in mid-June was ineffective in maintaining high crude protein levels, regardless of concentration. BA did not alter protein or total nonstructural carbohydrate content in big bluestem rhizomes, indicating that it had no deleterious effect on internal nutrient reserve cycles. Applying 5 ppm BA in either mid- or late-July significantly increased herbage yields the next year in comparison with yields of untreated plots.