• A 3-Year Evaluation of Taste Aversion Coyote Control in Saskatchewan

      Gustavson, C. R.; Jowsey, J. R.; Milligan, D. N. (Society for Range Management, 1982-01-01)
      Taste aversion programs using lithium chloride (LiCl) in sheep baits and carcasses have been applied in Washington to one sheep herd for 2 years; applications have been made in California and in Saskatchewan on 46 herds over 3 years. Ten of these 46 herds were available for statistical analysis, indicating a significant reduction in the percent of sheep lost to coyotes. All applications have suggested reduced sheep losses to coyotes (Canis latrans). This method of predation control may cost less than traditional techniques, save sheep, and should allow coyotes to carry out positive functions in the ecosystem.
    • A Balancing Act

      Frisina, Michael R.; Wambolt, Carl L.; Sowell, Bok; Knapp, Stephen J.; Sullivan, Mark; Johnson, Carolyn (Society for Range Management, 2001-06-01)
    • A Basis for Conservation Lease of Rangeland on the Edwards Plateau

      Huss, D. L. (Society for Range Management, 1955-09-01)
    • A Basis for Relative Growth Rate Differences Between Native and Invasive Forb Seedlings

      James, Jeremy J.; Drenovsky, Rebecca E. (Society for Range Management, 2007-07-01)
      The ability of invasive plants to achieve higher relative growth rates (RGR) than their native counterparts has been widely documented. However, the mechanisms allowing invasives to achieve higher RGR are poorly understood. The objective of this study was to determine the basis for RGR differences between native and invasive forbs that have widely invaded nutrient-poor soils of the Intermountain West. Six native and 6 invasive forbs were seeded in pots in a greenhouse, and 4 harvests were conducted over a 2-month period. These 4 harvests were used to calculate RGR and the components of RGR, net assimilation rate (rate of dry matter production per unit leaf area), leaf area ratio (LAR, leaf area per unit total plant mass), leaf mass ratio (the proportion of biomass allocated to leaves), and specific leaf area (SLA, leaf area per unit leaf biomass). Mean RGR of the 12 study species ranged between 0.04 and 0.15 g g-1 d-1 but was significantly higher for invasive forbs compared to native forbs (P = 0.036). The higher RGR achieved by invasive forbs was due mainly to a greater SLA and LAR. This indicates that invasive forbs achieved higher RGR than natives primarily by creating more leaf area per unit leaf mass, not by allocating more biomass to leaf tissue or by having a higher net rate of dry matter production. A high degree of variation in RGR, SLA, and LAR was observed in native forbs, suggesting that the ability to design weed-resistant plant communities may be improved by managing for specific functional traits as opposed to functional groups. 
    • A Behavioral Study of Angora Goats on West Texas Range

      Askins, G. D.; Turner, E. E. (Society for Range Management, 1972-03-01)
      Behavior of four Angora goats was studied in sixteen observation periods for four seasons on a west Texas range. The goats consistently fed during two definite daylight feeding periods: (a) early morning, and (b) late afternoon to dusk. Bedding generally occurred whenever darkness became evident and little or no feeding activity was observed between that time and daybreak. The four goats differed somewhat in their behavioral activities, but were remarkably similar in their vegetation preference. Seasonal difference seemed to have an important effect upon both vegetative preference and behavioral activities./Cuatro cabras fueron marcadas y sus actividades fueron observadas a través del año. Las cabras mostraron un patrón de actividades sistemático a través del año. Empezaron el día levantándose y rumiando por un tiempo breve, seguido por una época de pastoreo de tres horas, luego por 30 minutos de descanso y después pastoreo otra vez hasta mediodía. Tomaron agua y descansaron en la sombra durante medio día hasta tres horas antes de la puesta del sol. Comieron otra vez por tres horas o sea hasta en la noche cuando tomaron agua otra vez y comieron sal, seguido por descanso por toda la noche. Aproximadamente de 34.4% de su tiempo de pastoreo fué con gramíneas y 65.6% fué ramoneo. Parece ser que las estaciones del año tienen un importante efecto en la preferencia del forraje pastoreado, y las actividades de las cabras.
    • A Bibliometric Analysis of Worldwide Publications on Scrub

      Botello, Ana; Cabezas, José; Pulgarin, Antonio; Escudero, José C. (Society for Range Management, 1998-04-01)
    • A Brief History of How the Society for Range Management was Founded

      Howery, Larry D. (Society for Range Management, 2015-12-01)
      On the Ground • About eight decades ago, The Society for Range Managements founders began to shape and refine their collective vision to create a science-based professional society that would serve as a platform for learning and collaboration on all aspects of rangeland management. • The inaugural meeting in 1948 led to the founding of the American Society of Range Management (ASRM), a new journal dedicated to range science and management (The Journal of Range Management), an initial ASRM committee structure, and decentralization of ASRM through the formation of local sections. • ASRM (now known as The Society for Range Management or SRM) has achieved many milestones and accomplishments since its founding. Although todays issues are different and morecomplex than in 1948, the basic leadership principles espoused by the founders provide a template for addressing the challenges that the rangeland profession faces in the 21st century.
    • A Brief History of Range Management in the United States

      Holechek, Jerry L. (Society for Range Management, 1981-02-01)
    • A Capacitance Meter for Estimating Forage Weight

      Fletcher, J. E.; Robinson, M. E. (Society for Range Management, 1956-03-01)
    • A Case Study Evaluating Economic Implications of Two Grazing Strategies for Cattle Ranches in Northwest Argentina

      Quiroga, R. Emiliano; Blanco, Lisandro J.; Ferrando, Carlos A. (Society for Range Management, 2009-09-01)
      In the Argentinean Chaco Arido region, cattle production based on cow-calf operations is the principal source of agricultural income, and rangeland is the main forage source for cattle. Traditional grazing strategy (TGS, high stocking rate and continuous grazing) is considered the main cause of current rangeland degradation. Research shows that rangeland and cattle production improvements are possible when using a conservative grazing strategy (CGS, moderate stocking rate and rest rotation grazing). The aim of this research was to compare the effects of TGS and CGS applications on economic results for a cattle ranch in the region. To achieve this objective we used an approach that included estimations of forage and cattle production, and economic results. The study period was 1972/73–1983/84. Results showed that during the study period forage production and herd size were almost doubled with CGS, but maintained with TGS. The difference in net income between CGS and TGS (in Argentinean pesos, ), increased linearly from negative (–2.88 ha-1) to positive (4.48 ha-1) in the first 4 yr, and then was maintained at positive values (averaging 4.48 ha-1). Data suggest that CGS leads to higher productivity and better economic results than TGS in the medium and long terms. 
    • A Case Study for Optimal Allocation of Range Resources

      D'Aquino, S. A. (Society for Range Management, 1974-05-01)
      A linear programming model was developed to help in the management of range resource systems. This analysis simultaneously considers per acre management costs and resulting per animal gross revenues. The management plan sets out a season-by-season use of land areas and associated forage resources with the objective of maximizing net dollar returns. Procedures developed in this study may also be applied to public resource management problems.
    • A Case Study in Woodland Restoration

      Boettcher, Susan E.; Johnson, W. Carter; Gartner, F. Robert (Society for Range Management, 1995-02-01)
    • A Century of Managing Rangelands on National Forests: Or It Ain’t Easy Being a Range Con in the New West

      Reed, Floyd; Bradford, David; McConkey, Justin (Society for Range Management, 2005-06-01)
    • A Century of Rangeland Conservation in the Forest Service

      Bosworth, Dale (Society for Range Management, 2005-06-01)
    • A Challenge to Stockmen and Range Officials

      Savage, D. A. (Society for Range Management, 1951-05-01)
    • A Challenge to Stockmen and Range Officials

      Savage, D. A. (Society for Range Management, 1951-05-01)
    • A chamber design for measuring net CO2 exchange on rangeland

      Angell, R.; Svejcar, T. (Society for Range Management, 1999-01-01)
      Net carbon exchange of terrestrial ecosystems will likely change as atmospheric CO2 concentration increases. Currently, little is known of the annual dynamics or magnitude of CO2 flux on many native and agricultural ecosystems. Remoteness of many ecosystems has limited our ability to measure CO2 flux on undisturbed vegetation. Today, many plant ecologists have portable photosynthesis systems with which they make single-leaf photosynthesis measurements. Utility of this equipment is enhanced when canopy-level CO2 flux is also measured. We designed a portable 1-m3 closed chamber for use in measuring CO2 exchange in short statured vegetation with widely varied canopy structure. The design includes external ductwork equipped with doors which are used to open the chamber for ventilation with outside air between measurements. The chamber was tested on a Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. Wyomingensis Nutt.)/Thurber's needlegrass (Stipa thurberiana Piper) community using 10 plots equally divided between shrub and interspace. The ductwork and doors provided adequate ventilation to allow consecutive measurements of CO2 flux without removing the chamber from the plot. The chamber could differentiate CO2 flux between plots with sagebrush and those with grass only, even at relatively low fluxes. Net CO2 uptake per unit ground area was greater (P = 0.04) on sagebrush-grass plots (7.6 +/- 1.4 micromoles m-2 s-1) than on interspace plots without sagebrush (3.1 +/- 1.0 micromole m-2 s-1). Chamber and leaf temperature increased by an average of 0.5 and 1.2 degrees C, respectively, during measurements.
    • A Chemical-Fallow Technique for Control of Downy Brome and Establishment of Perennial Grasses on Rangeland

      Eckert, R. E.; Evans, R. A. (Society for Range Management, 1967-01-01)
      Downy brome was controlled with three soil-active herbicides: atrazine, EPTC, and IPC. Seedings were made 1 year after herbicide application. If fallow were effective during this year, soil moisture was conserved. Seeding in deep furrows resulted in superior seedling stands and greater 2nd and 3rd year production than did surface drilling. Performance of Amur intermediate wheatgrass was superior to Standard crested and Topar pubescent wheatgrasses.