• Early Bronze Age Chronology: Radiocarbon Dates and Chronological Models from Tel Yarmuth (Israel)

      Regev, Johanna; de Miroschedji, Pierre; Boaretto, Elisabetta (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 2012-10-15)
      Over the years, 40 radiocarbon samples (charcoal and seeds) have been measured from the site of Tel Yarmuth. These samples originate from 3 major archaeological periods: Final Early Bronze Age (henceforth EB) I, EB II, and EB IIIB-C. The samples are further on divided into 8 separate archaeological phases. Bayesian modeling analyses were performed on the data. Separate models were run with seeds and charcoals to detect a possible old-wood effect. Outliers were detected, and finally models with gaps were run to account for the lack of samples from 2 archaeological layers. The results suggest that at Tel Yarmuth the end of the EB II occurred ~2950–2880 BC, and that the EB III ended at the latest ~2450 BC, perhaps before 2500 BC. Although these dates are somewhat earlier than traditionally assumed, they are in close accordance with the new analysis of other 14C dates for the Early Bronze Age in the southern Levant (Regev et al., these proceedings).
    • Early Bronze Age Strata at Tell Ghanem al-Ali along the Middle Euphrates in Syria: A Preliminary Report of 14C Dating Results

      Nakamura, T.; Hoshino, M.; Tanaka, T.; Yoshida, H.; Saito, T.; Tsukada, K.; Katsurada, Y.; Aoki, Y.; Ohta, T.; Hasegawa, A.; et al. (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 2010-01-01)
      We collected charcoal fragments during an archaeological excavation at the Tell Ghanem al-Ali site, located on the lowest terrace of the middle Euphrates River, and measured their radiocarbon ages with accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). Two trenches, Square-1 and Square-2, were dug on the slope of the tell; 8 building levels were detected in the Square-2 trench. In total, 31 charcoal samples were collected from the 2 trenches, and their calibrated ages ranged from 3100-2900 cal BC at the lowest building level to 2400-2050 cal BC at the uppermost layers of the mound, and concentrated in the period 2650-2450 cal BC. The pottery fragments collected on the surface of the mound before the excavation survey was started, as well as those collected from the sediment layers during the excavation, were assigned on the basis of typological sequences to the Early Bronze Age (EB)-III and EB-IV periods. Thus, the concentrated dates (2650-2450 cal BC) obtained by 14C dating are consistent with the age estimated by archaeological contexts. However, the oldest dates of the lowest level (level-7) go back to 3100-2900 cal BC, and these dates may suggest the existence of the human residence prior to the EB period at the site, and may therefore lead to a revision of the oldest age limit of the EB period currently accepted in the region.
    • Early Bronze Jericho: High-Precision 14C Dates of Short-Lived Palaeobotanic Remains

      Bruins, Hendrik J.; van der Plicht, Johannes (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1998-01-01)
      Reliable series of high-precision radiocarbon dates in a stratified archaeological context are of great importance for interdisciplinary chronological and historical studies. The Early Bronze Age in the Near East is characterized by the beginning of the great civilizations in Egypt and Mesopotamia, as well as by urbanization in the Levant. We present stratified high-precision dates of short-lived material of Tell es-Sultan (Jericho), covering Late Proto-Urban/EB I, EB II and EB III layers from Trench III. Our calibrated dates, refined by Bayesian sequence analysis involving Gibbs sampling, are ca. 150-300 yr older than conventional archaeological age assessments. The corpus of 14C dates measured in the first decades after the discovery of 14C dating should not be taken too seriously. The 14C dates of Jericho measured by the British Museum 14C laboratory in 1971 appear to be erroneous.
    • Early English Boats

      Switsur, Roy (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01)
      A large number of early boats discovered in the waterways of England are presently displayed in museums and as public monuments. In some cases conservation practices have caused problems in the radiocarbon dating of these otherwise undated artifacts. Specimen pretreatments are described and the chronology of the boats in different regions of England are presented with approximate calibration to calendar date ranges.
    • Early Iron Age Radiometric Dates from Tel Dor: Preliminary Implications for Phoenicia and Beyond

      Gilboa, Ayelet; Sharon, Ilan (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 2001-01-01)
      The absolute date of the Iron Age I and IIa periods in Israel, and by inference in the Southern Levant at large, are to date among the hottest debated issues in Syro-Palestinian archaeology. As there are no pegs of absolute chronology throughout this range, conventional chronology had been established on proposed correlations of the material record with events and social phenomena as portrayed in historical and literary sources, chiefly the Hebrew Bible. With the growing impact of so-called “revisionist” notions in Biblical studies, which to various extents question the historicity of the Bible, it is imperative to try to establish a chronological framework for the Iron I–IIa range that is independent of historical and so forth considerations, inter alia in order to be able to offer an independent archaeological perspective of the biblical debate. The most obvious solution is to attempt a radiocarbon-based chronology. This paper explores the possible implications of a sequence of 22 radiometric dates obtained from a detailed Iron I–IIa stratigraphic/ceramic sequence at Tel Dor, on Israel’s Mediterranean coast. To date, this is the largest such sequence from any single early Iron Age site in Israel. Having been part of the Phoenician commercial sphere in the early Iron Age, Dor offers a variegated sequence of ceramics that have a significant spatial distribution beyond Phoenicia, and thus transcend regional differences and enable correlation with the surrounding regions. By and large, the absolute dates of these ceramics by the Dor radiometric chronology are up to a century lower than those established by conventional Palestinian ceramic chronology. The ramifications of the lower Dor dates for some Phoenician, Israelite, and Cypriot early Iron Age archaeological issues are explored.
    • Early Slavonic Settlements and Navigation at the Mouth of the Odra River

      Awsiuk, Romuald; Filipowiak, Władyslaw; Goslar, Tomasz; Pazdur, Anna; Pazdur, Mieczysław F. (American Journal of Science, 1986-01-01)
      An attempt is presented to establish an absolute chronology of early Slavonic habitation in the region of the mouth of the Odra River up to the Baltic and to find associations with a series of stave boats and dugouts of different levels of technology and navigation. The methodology of the research project is presented and some conclusions of a general nature are drawn from the results already obtained.
    • Early Subneolithic Ceramic Sequences in Eastern Fennoscandia—A Bayesian Approach

      Pesonen, Petro; Oinonen, Markku; Carpelan, Christian; Onkamo, Päivi (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 2012-10-15)
      In this contribution, we establish a radiocarbon-based chronology of early ceramic sequences in eastern Fennoscandia utilizing a Bayesian approach. The data consist of 56 individual 14C dates from charred or fermented food remains (charred crust, food residue) and birch bark tar used to seal cracks in vessels. We present the results of the models, discuss the chronological boundaries obtained, and compare the outcome with contemporary archaeological knowledge of the Subneolithic in eastern Fennoscandia. We also look at the role of charred crust δ13C values as indicators of reservoir effect present in the dates, perform some preliminary correction procedures for the dates, and discuss their effect on the chronologies.
    • Ecological Chronology of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Sites

      Buzinny, Michael; Kovalyukh, Nikolaj; Likhtarjov, Ilja; Los, Ivan; Nesvetajlo, Valerij; Pazdur, Mieczysław F.; Skripkin, Vadim; Shkvorets, Oleg; Sobotovich, Emlen (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1995-01-01)
      We compared 14C levels in annual growth rings of pine trees around the Tomsk nuclear fuel reprocessing plant (NFRP) and the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (NPP). At the Chernobyl site, samples were taken from the control area (within a 30-km radius zone around the site) to a distance of 80 km. In Tomsk, we collected samples between 8-10 km and 10-15 km from the site, taking into account prevailing wind directions. Background samples were collected 200 km from the plant. Samples were converted to benzene and counted in an ultra-low-level LSC Quantulus 1220(TM). Because of the Chernobyl accident, a signal can be detected in the background of routine plant operation. Comparison with the Tomsk data suggests that the routine discharges from Tomsk are more significant than the discharge from the Chernobyl accident. We estimated Tomsk NFRP annual discharge level at up to 30115 TBq 14C from 1985 to 1988.
    • Ede Hertelendi (1950-1999)

      Svingor, Éva (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1999-01-01)
    • Editorial Board

      Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 2011-01-01
    • Editorial Board

      McClure, Mark (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 2011-09-16)
    • Editorial Board

      Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 2010-01-01
    • Editorial Board

      Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 2010-01-01
    • Editorial Board

      Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 2008-01-01
    • Editorial Board

      Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 2010-01-01
    • Editorial Board

      Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 2009-01-01
    • Editorial Board

      Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 2010-01-01
    • Editorial Board

      Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 2011-01-01
    • Editorial Board

      Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 2009-01-01
    • Editorial Board

      Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 2009-01-01