ABOUT THIS COLLECTION

Radiocarbon is the main international journal of record for research articles and date lists relevant to 14C and other radioisotopes and techniques used in archaeological, geophysical, oceanographic, and related dating.

This archive provides access to Radiocarbon Volumes 1-54 (1959-2012).

As of 2016, Radiocarbon is published by Cambridge University Press. The journal is published quarterly. Radiocarbon also publishes conference proceedings and monographs on topics related to fields of interest. Visit Cambridge Online for new Radiocarbon content and to submit manuscripts.

ISSN: 0033-8222

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Recent Submissions

  • The Participants

    Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01
  • Revised Notice to Readers and Contributors

    Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01
  • Report on the Workshop on the International Collaborative Study

    Scott, E. M. (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01)
  • North American Archaeologist

    Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01
  • List of Participants

    Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01
  • International Workshop on Inter-Comparison of Radiocarbon Laboratories

    Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01
  • High Pressure Combustion Unit for Radiocarbon Dating

    Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01
  • Foreword and Acknowledgments

    Long, Austin; Srdoč, Dušan (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01)
  • Announcing...The 14th International Radiocarbon Conference

    Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01
  • AMS Geoscientist

    Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01
  • Use of the CO2 Source in Radiocarbon Dating by AMS

    Bronk, C. R.; Hedges, R. M. (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01)
    Since Middleton showed the potential for a sputter source working from CO2, we have been building a source which can automatically change samples. The source produces a maximum beam of 25 micro-A of C-, with typical operation between 10 and 20 micro-A. Although beam generation from the source is very reliable, the mechanics of sample changing have given considerable problems. The changing of samples also involves considerable care in gas handling, and a computer control system has been written which ensures the correct sequence of the 16 operations required for sample change.
  • Variation of Concentration, 14C Activity and 13C/12C Ratios of CO2 in Air Samples from Kitt Peak, Arizona

    Leavitt, S. W.; Long, Austin (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01)
    Air was sampled with 5L flasks at Kitt Peak (2100m elev) from 1983 through 1984 at approximately monthly intervals, occasionally supplemented with air samples from urban Tucson ca 75km away (760m elev). The Kitt Peak CO2 concentrations, represented by a yield measurement, fluctuated ca 25% over the monitoring period. The delta-13C values (uncorrected for N20) varied from ca -7.6 to -9.0%, with high values (and low CO2 yields) in the late summer consistent with hemispheric seasonal biosphere effects. Tucson air has lower delta-13C values and possibly greater CO2 yield suggesting a local fossil-fuel effect. 14C activity of four Kitt Peak samples range from 1.158 +/- .007 to 1.223 +/- .008 as uncorrected fraction of modern, below free air activity of ca 1.250 for 1984 even after correcting for fractionation. The slightly low 14C activity and delta-13C values suggest the Kitt Peak air is not quite 100% clean and there may be a local/regional fossil-fuel contribution, but CO2 concentrations are similar to background atmospheric values.
  • Ultra-Small Carbon Samples and the Dating of Sediments

    Vogel, J. S.; Briskin, Madeleine; Nelson, D. E.; Southon, J. R. (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01)
    Radiocarbon dates from sediment core samples are usually obtained on the whole organic carbon portion in order to use as little of the valuable sediment as possible. Such measurements may not result in an accurate chronology of the sediment because the material may include carbon from different reservoirs at the time of deposition. The development of AMS techniques for dating ultra-small (20-500 micrograms) carbon samples permits dating various components of cored sediments. We give examples of physical and chemical fractions of sediments which illustrate the large differences in ages obtainable from materials at the same sediment depth. The dating of all or several of these fractions demands more complex interpretations than just the derivation of a sedimentation rate from whole organic carbon dates.
  • Tritium and 14C in Tree Rings of the Last Three Decades

    Kozák, Kristóf; Obelić, Bogomil; Horvatinčić, Nada (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01)
    Tree rings spanning the past three decades were collected from Picea spp trees grown in Matra, northern Hungary. Cellulose was prepared from the wood and samples were separately combusted for tritium and 14C analyses. Methane was synthesized from CO2 obtained by sample combustion via catalytic reaction with tritium-free hydrogen. 14C activity was measured by proportional counter. The exchangeable tritium was removed from cellulose samples used for tritium analysis. Water samples produced by combustion were measured by liquid scintillation counting. The distribution of tritium and 14C activities in tree rings are shown for years 1956-1986. Results are compared with published data on global-scale distribution of 14C and HTO. A comparison of tritium activity in precipitation and wine samples from the same region is presented.
  • The Timing of the Post-Glacial Marine Invasion of Kau Bay, Halmahara, Indonesia

    Barmawidjaja, D. M.; De Jong, A. F. M.; van der Borg, Klaas; Van der Kaars, W. A.; Van der Linden, W. J. M.; Zachariasse, W. J. (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01)
    Kau Bay, Halmahera, Indonesia is a small marine basin that is separated from the adjacent SW Pacific Ocean by a shallow sill, 40m deep. Radiocarbon dating on piston cores in combination with a study on microfossils demonstrate that Kau Bay was a freshwater lake in Weichselian times. At 10,000 BP, the Bay became reconnected with the open ocean. If sill depth did not change in the intervening years, sea level at 10,000 BP stood 40m below the present level.
  • The Recovery and Dating of Carbon Dioxide in Polar Ice Cores

    Wilson, A. T.; Donahue, Douglas J. (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01)
    A new method is described for recovering trapped CO2 from polar ice cores. The ice is sublimed under vacuum, and H2O vapor and CO2 are collected at appropriate cold traps. The application of this method to obtain CO2 from a specific ice core, the conversion of that CO2 to graphite, and the measurement of radiocarbon in the CO2 are described in detail. The potentialities and problems of the method are discussed.
  • The Role of 36Cl and 14C Measurements in Australian Groundwater Studies

    Bird, J. R.; Calf, G. E.; Davie, R. F.; Fifield, L. K.; Ophel, T. R.; Evans, W. R.; Kellett, J. R.; Habermehl, M. A. (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01)
    An Accelerator Mass Spectrometry system has been developed using the 14UD tandem accelerator at the Australian National University. It has been used for 36Cl measurements on groundwater samples from the Murray Basin in southeastern Australia. Measurements of 14C have also been made on the same groundwaters. The information can be combined with stable isotope ratios and other data to illustrate the occurrence of processes such as radioactive decay and local recharge in different aquifers.
  • The Need for a Calibrated Radiocarbon Chronology of Near East Archaeology

    Bruins, H. J.; Mook, W. G. (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01)
    Progress in radiocarbon dating and calibration accuracy should lead to the development of a calibrated radiocarbon chronology of Near Eastern archaeology, particulary for historical times. The lack of such an independent and impartial chronology is a major constraint, not only in archaeological studies, but also for interdisciplinary research involving the history of man, landscape and climate in the Near East and adjacent regions.
  • The Radiocarbon Data Base of Japan

    Omoto, Kunio (Department of Geosciences, The University of Arizona, 1989-01-01)
    About ten radiocarbon laboratories operate in Japan and have dated more than 25,000 samples since 1960. Geomorphic development and human activities since the last glaciation have been documented with radiocarbon determinations. In order to apply these dates more effectively, the author finds it necessary to create and maintain a radiocarbon database system, which he has been doing since 1985, using a personal computer system linked to a telephone line. A researcher may access, search and retrieve data from the Radiocarbon Database System of Japan.

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