• A Contribution to the Interpretation of 14C Groundwater Ages Considering the Example of a Partially Confirmed Sandstone Aquifer

      Eichinger, Lorenz (American Journal of Science, 1983-01-01)
      Previously described models and a new model were compared to determine the initial 14C content of groundwater in a partially-confined and unconfined sandstone aquifer (Fränkisches Albvorland, Germany). Isotope and chemical data were derived from samples of water, soil-CO2, and solid carbonates. The various 14C models lead to important differences in resulting groundwater ages. From the relationship between 14C and 2H or 18O concentrations of groundwater, it must be assumed that chemical and/or physical carbon isotope exchange between the DIC and the solid carbonate has occurred provided the groundwater with lower 18O and 2H concentrations was generated during the Pleistocene. Groundwater ages deduced from 14C and 39Ar concentrations showed discrepancies which can be explained if carbon isotope exchange between DIC and solid carbonate as well as mixing of recent and fossil waters is considered.
    • The Reliability of Archaeologic Interpretation of Radiocarbon Dates

      Willkomm, Horst (American Journal of Science, 1983-01-01)
      14C dates of a medieval settlement with archaeologically well-dated strata are compared with the true ages of the respective layers. The 14C values indicate that each layer may contain older material reaching up to the beginning of settlement. Therefore, the 14C measurement of only a few wood or charcoal samples may lead to age estimations several hundred years too old.
    • The Unreliability of 14C Dates Obtained from Buried Sandy Podzols

      Geyh, Mebus A.; Roeschmann, Günter; Wijmstra, T. A.; Middeldorp, A. A. (American Journal of Science, 1983-01-01)
      A test for the reliability of 14C dating of soil was made at two sites with buried, autochthonous, and in parts, allochthonous sandy podzols, dated either lithoand pedostratigraphically or palynologically. The differences between the age ranges obtained and the apparent mean residence times (AMRT) calculated from the 14C content of alkaline extracts from fossil soil layers and horizons lean in organic matter exceed 10,000 years, corresponding to a maximum contamination with recent carbon of up to 50 %. The use of correction factors for the apparent mean residence times of podzols is not valid, not even for climate zones, because these values have a broad scatter for the same profile.