• Calibrated 14C Dates in Central Europe - Same as Elsewhere?

      Freundlich, J. C.; Schmidt, Burghart (American Journal of Science, 1983-01-01)
      14C dating results derived from an absolutely-dated 471-year tree-ring sequence from central European oak show a trend towards somewhat older dates than those for bristlecone pine tree rings of the same age, but similar to those for Egyptian historical samples. Differences visible between these trend lines are not relevant considering the standard errors proposed by Clark (1975).
    • Current 14C Measurements with the University of Washington Accelerator Facility for Radioisotope Dating

      Farwell, G. W.; Grootes, P. M.; Leach, D. D.; Schmidt, F. H.; Stuiver, Minze (American Journal of Science, 1983-01-01)
      Our accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) system shows a one-to-one relationship between sample 14C concentrations determined by AMS and by Beta-counting. Measurements of unknown samples against a standard indicate that 14C concentration measurements to better than 2% can be made. For a 30-second data collection interval in a typical run of 100 intervals, the variability of the beam injected into the accelerator is ca 2%, that of the machine transmission is ca 4%, and counting statistics give 4.7% standard deviation for a sample of 80% of modern carbon.
    • Recent 14C Measurements with the Chalk River Tandem Accelerator

      Brown, R. M.; Andrews, H. R.; Ball, G. C.; Burn, Neil; Davies, W. G.; Imahori, Yoshio; Milton, J. C. D.; Workman, Wayne (American Journal of Science, 1983-01-01)
      The Chalk River Tandem Accelerator Mass Spectrometry System has reached a state of reliable measurement of 14C using 2 to 5mg elemental carbon prepared by Mg reduction of CO2. For two comparisons of a near-modern unknown with the NBS oxalic acid standard we obtain a total error of ∼ +/- 4.5%, consisting of a random system error of about +/- 3.5% combined with the statistical counting error. Measurements have been made on 70 samples in 30 days of running time during the past year. Samples included deep rock carbonates, cosmogenic 14C in meteorites, charcoal from earthquake fault zones, collagen of bone artifacts and fossil beetle-fragments.