• CONTROL FAILURES IN AN UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEM AND THE POTENTIAL FOR STATELESS CONTROL

      Marcellin, Michael; Norland, Kyle; Univ Arizona, Dept Electrical and Computer Engineering (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2019-10)
      To participate in the 2019 SUAS competition, an Unmanned Aerial System (UAS), was built. Unfortunately, several critical failures occurred, including an unwanted circling behavior, and an unnecessary self-crash. The analysis of both behaviors revealed surface level errors in the scripts and devices that were used, but also a deeper flaw in the architecture of state based behaviors and conditional state transitions. To address these failures, an alternative architecture based around stateless controls was designed and tested. It successfully resolved the issues, and seems to hold promise as an alternative control system architecture, especially in non-linear environments.
    • DESIGNING A TELEMETRY SYSTEM WITH A FOCUS ON EDUCATION

      Marcellin, Michael; Fuehrer, Daniel; Nguyen, James; Schreiber, Andre; Univ Arizona, Dept Electrical and Computer Engineering (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2019-10)
      The University of Arizona Baja Racing team competes in an international competition each year. We build a custom telemetry system for the car to collect data during races in order to inform design decisions and warn of upcoming problems. This paper will focus on the contrast between designing a system for production versus designing for the educational experience, as is the ultimate goal of our team. We will specifically discuss this contrast in the areas of size, power consumption, manufacturability, maintainability, repairability, and testability.
    • TELEMETRY ON WILDCAT FORMULA RACING VEHICLE

      Marcellin, Michael; Tan, Nicolas; Univ Arizona, Wildcat Formula Racing (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2019-10)
      The Wildcat Formula Racing Team of the University of Arizona participates in an annual engineering design competition where students compete with small formula-style racing cars. One of the challenges we face is to provide justification of our design choices to the judges. To establish means of collecting data used as evidence and analysis, we use a mixture of automotive sensors and electronic sensors to be transmitted onto an external microcontroller, an Arduino. The data will then be stored locally and broadcasted from the vehicle to the pit with a transceiver module for post-race data analysis, as well as feedback for the team.
    • TELEMETRY SYSTEM FOR MONITORING STRESS AND VIBRATIONS ON AMUSEMENT PARK RIDES

      Marcellin, Michael; Collett, Anthony; Ma, Tiffany; Craddock, Zane; Garcia, Gerardo; George, Charles; Univ Arizona, Dept Electrical and Computer Engineering (International Foundation for Telemetering, 2019-10)
      On amusement park rides, vibrations against the rails of the track and the cars’ wheels can strain and damage the track. This is especially true for older coasters, whose tracks have worn significantly over time. While manual inspection of the track is necessary, an automated system that monitors the stress on the track will help detect anomalies, ensuring a safe experience for the passengers. We have designed a system of sensors that can monitor these vibrations. Sensors placed on a segment of track will measure the lateral and vertical vibrations, wirelessly transmitting the level of strain on the track to a base station. If vibrations reach a threshold level, the base station will be alerted of excessive strain. The system will create a graph of points where vibration is worse than other points, to pinpoint what areas need to be fixed the most. This will decrease maintenance costs and ensure increased safety for patrons of these rides.