• Rainwater harvesting for increasing livestock forage on arid rangelands of Pakistan

      Suleman, S.; Wood, M. K.; Shah, B. H.; Murray, L. (Society for Range Management, 1995-11-01)
      This study determined forage production and cover of several plant species resulting from the use of water harvesting catchments with catchment: cultivated area ratios of 1:1 and 1.25:1 and contributing aprons with 7, 10, and 15% slope gradients. Plots with 1.25:1 ratios produced more forage and had more cover than plots with 1:1 and 0:1 ratios. Plots with 7, 10, and 15% slope gradients had similar forage production and cover. Tuft planted plots produced more forage and cover than seeded plots. Ghorka (Elionurus hirsutus (Vahl) Munro), blue panicum (Panicum antidotale Retz.), and buffer (Cenchrus ciliaris L.) grasses produced similar forage and cover, which was higher than khev grass (Sporobolus helvolus (Trin.) Th. Dur. & Schinz) production and cover.
    • Water erosion prediction project (WEPP) rangeland hydrology component evaluation on a Texas range site

      Savabi, M. R.; Rawls, W. J.; Knight, R. W. (Society for Range Management, 1995-11-01)
      The USDA-Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) is a new technology based on the fundamentals of hydrology, soil physics, plant science, hydraulics, and erosion mechanics. WEPP hydrology includes simulation of excess rainfall using the Green and Ampt infiltration equation, surface runoff routing, evapotranspiration, percolation, and surface drainage. Hydrometeorological, soil, topography, and vegetation data from a range in Texas were used to test the WEPP rangeland hydrology model. Measured surface runoff and root zone soil water content from the site were compared with the simulated results of the WEPP model. The results indicate that the WEPP model (version 93.0) is capable of simulating soil water content and storm runoff. The Nash and Sutcliffe coefficient, NSR, between measured and simulated root zone soil water content and storm runoff was .88 and .84, respectively, for the bare ground plots. However, for the plots with herbaceous vegetation the discrepancy between model simulated storm runoff and soil water content was more than expected (NSR = .46 and NSR = .53, respectively).