• Use of new rangeland seedings by black-tailed jackrabbits

      McAdoo, J. K.; Longland, W. S.; Cluff, G. J.; Klebenow, D. A. (Society for Range Management, 1987-11-01)
      Black-tailed jackrabbit (Lepus californicus) use of 2 new rangeland seedings in northern and central Nevada was determined by fecal pellet counts for the first growing seasons following seeding establishment. Jackrabbit use was an inverse function of seeding size (as indicated by distance from seeding edges to midpoints). Use was uniformly high for a small (50-ha) seeding from its edge to its midpoint. A larger (400-ha) seeding received significantly higher use at the edge than at 100-m intervals extending to the 400-m midpoint. Jackrabbit use of seedings was higher during late summer than during early summer. Jackrabbit abundance was significantly higher in sagebrush habitat adjacent to a new seeding than in similar habitat away from the seeding. Our results suggest that forage availability is a factor influencing use of seedings, and predation risk may also be involved.