• Grass Species Adaptability in the Southern High Plains—A 36-Year Assessment

      Eck, H. V.; Sims, P. L. (Society for Range Management, 1984-05-01)
      A 36-yr old species adaptation test was evaluated and the relative quality of some persisting native and introduced grass species was determined. The site was Conlen loam on the Rita Blanca National Grassland in Dallam County, Texas. Of the 25 species planted, only yellow bluestem (Bothriochloa ischaemum),1 Caucasian bluestem (Bothriochloa caucasica), and galleta (Hilaria jamesii) tended to dominate the plots on which they were originally planted. Yellow and Caucasian bluestem had spread into plots planted to other grasses but galleta had spread very little. Yellow bluestem was as high or higher in protein, mineral content, and digestibility (IVDMD) than the other grasses analyzed [Caucasian bluestem, galleta, sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula), blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), and western wheatgrass (Agropyron smithii)]. The contents of Caucasian bluestem and galleta were not significantly different from those of yellow bluestem, except that galleta was lower in IVDMD, especially when mature. These 3 grasses merit consideration in range seeding programs on Conlen and similar soils in the Southern High Plains.