• Summer Diets of Bison and Cattle in Southern Utah

      Van Yuren, D. (Society for Range Management, 1984-05-01)
      Diets of bison (Bison bison) and cattle (Bos taurus) were evaluated in a shrub-steppe plant community in the Henry Mountains, Utah. Bison feces comprised 99% grasses and sedges and 1% forbs. Cattle feces also were primarily grasses and sedges (95%), but in addition included significantly more forbs (5%) than did bison feces.
    • Vegetation Change after 13 Years of Live-Stock Grazing Exclusion on Sagebrush Semidesert in West Central Utah

      West, N. E.; Provenza, F. D.; Johnson, P. S.; Owens, M. K. (Society for Range Management, 1984-05-01)
      Range managers often assume that release of vegetation from livestock grazing pressure will automatically result in a trend toward the pristine condition. The pathways and time scales for recovery are also sometimes assumed to be the same as for retrogression. These assumptions were examined via monitoring of plant community composition and forage production in five large paddocks of sagebrush semi-desert vegetation in west central Utah over a 13-year interval. No significant increases in native perennial grasses were noted over this period despite a trend toward more favorable precipitation in recent years. Thus, the present brush-dominated plant community is probably successionally stable. A return to vegetation similar to the original sagebrush-native grass mixture is unlikely. The possibility of a successional deflection via fire is enhanced by the increase of annual grass. Improvement of forage production in this vegetation will not necessarily follow after livestock exclusion. Direction manipulations are mandatory if rapid returns to perennial grass dominants are desired in such environments.