• Botanical Composition of Cattle Diets Grazing Brush Managed Pastures in East-Central Texas

      Kirby, D. R.; Stuth, J. W. (Society for Range Management, 1982-07-01)
      More grass was consumed in all grazing periods on tebuthiuron-treated pastures, and in fall and summer grazing periods on mechanically treated pastures, than on untreated pastures. Cow diets were dominated by grasses, mainly brownseed paspalum and little bluestem, regardless of treatment and season. Similar amounts of forbs were selected from all treatments during all seasons. More woody vegetation was selected from mechanically-treated and untreated pastures than from tebuthiuron-treated pastures. Forbs decreased and woody vegetation increased in diets from spring through fall. Grasses and leaves decreased, whereas woody vegetation and stems increased in the diets from the beginning to the end of the grazing periods. Within grazing periods forb consumption decreased in fall but increased in summer and spring with time spent in pastures. Small amounts of dead forage were consumed at irregular intervals.
    • Brush Management Influences the Nutritive Content of Cattle Diets in East-Central Texas

      Kirby, D. R.; Stuth, J. W. (Society for Range Management, 1982-07-01)
      Nutritive content of seasonal diets following mechanical and chemical brush management on east-central Texas rangeland was determined using esophageally fistulated cows. Brush managed pastures had a greater herbaceous standing crop, except during the grazing period in fall the year of treatment, and generally yielded diets higher in crude protein (CP) and in vitro digestible organic matter (IVDOM) than untreated pastures. Mean crude protein content of cattle diets was higher (P is lesser than or equal to 0.05) in all seasons from tebuthiuron-treated pastures, and in summer and fall from pastures which were bulldozed compared to untreated pastures. Mean IVDOM content of cattle diets was higher (P≤0.05) in spring and summer from pastures receiving brush management compared to untreated pastures. Crude protein and IVDOM content of diets decreased in all pastures and seasons between beginning and end of grazing periods, with the exception of higher IVDOM in the spring, suggesting that the cows benefitted by grazing regrowth of herbaceous plants.