• Rangeland Management and the Environment

      Baumer, M. (Society for Range Management, 1982-01-01)
      Management of the rangelands of the world for multiple use is a complicated process. Rangeland productivity can be increased by several means. However, some of these means have undesirable ecological consequences. There is a need for integration of range ecosystems management on a world-wide scale under an ecological framework.
    • Reseeding by Eight Alfalfa Populations in a Semiarid Pasture

      Rumbaugh, M. D. (Society for Range Management, 1982-01-01)
      Eight alfalfa populations were seeded in a dryland pasture in northern Utah. Densities of mature plants, seeds, seedlings, and 1-year-old plants were measured in each of 3 years. The populations did not differ for mature plant stands or seed production. There was a higher rate of seedling survival for populations that primarily originated from Medicago sativa rather than M. falcata. All populations had some one-year-old plants persisting to replace mature plants killed by disease or rodents.
    • Response of Chihuahuan Desert Mountain Shrub Vegetation to Burning

      Ahlstrand, G. M. (Society for Range Management, 1982-01-01)
      The effects of fire on vegetation in the desert mountain shrub community were studied on 3 to 7-year-old burned sites near the northern limits of the Chihuahuan Desert. Coverage and frequency of redberry juniper (Juniperus pinchotii) and frequency of whiteball acacia (Acacia texensis) were lower, while frequencies of catclaw mimosa (Mimosa biuncifera) and skeleton goldeneye (Viguiera stenoloba) were higher on burned sites when compared with unburned paired plants. Lechuguilla (Agave lecheguilla), sotol (Dasylirion leiophyllum), and sacahuista (Nolina spp.) suffered losses in excess of 50% on burned sites. With the exceptions of sideoats grama (Bouteloua curtipendula) and bull muhly (Muhlenbergia emersleyi), all grasses had recovered or showed increases by the end of three growing seasons. All grasses had recovered or increased on 6 to 7-year-old burns. Recovery of burned plants was predominately by vegetative means, suggesting that periodic fires can be used to maintain or even increase grass coverage at the expense of shrubs in this community.
    • Response of Small Mammals to Livestock Grazing in Southcentral Idaho

      Johnson, M. K. (Society for Range Management, 1982-01-01)
      The effects of livestock grazing on populations of wildlife have been addressed in two recent studies on the INEL Site. However, studies were performed by measuring indices of abundance among areas where different practices had occurred prior to initiation of study. There is no proof that differences detected among the areas actually resulted from the land use practices. Studies should be conducted with replication and strict controls before correlated data can be accepted as indicators of cause and effect relationships. The large variation in the occurrence and densities of small mammals among areas with the same or similar uses suggests the need for further studies to resolve conflicting conclusions.
    • Seasonal Diurnal Variation in Composition of Cow Diets

      Kirby, D. R.; Stuth, J. W. (Society for Range Management, 1982-01-01)
      Seasonal diets between fall 1977 and spring 1979 were collected in morning and evening from esophageally fistulated cows in the Post Oak Savannah of east-central Texas. Chemical content of diurnal diets were similar within a season except CP was higher in evening collections as compared to morning collections during fall. Cows appeared to select for energy (IVDOM) over CP. Botanical composition of morning and evening diets differed only during summer. Since the cows spent more time during hot summer afternoons in the shade of woody plants, less grass and more forbs, vines, and woody vegetation were selected. Research based on morning diet collections only might result in biased samples. Recognition of nutritional and environmental stresses with potential to alter grazing behavior of animals is critical for accurate sampling of livestock diets.
    • Summer Grazing of Sagebrush-Grass Range by Sheep

      Harniss, R. O.; Wright, H. A. (Society for Range Management, 1982-01-01)
      Sagebrush-grass range normally grazed in the spring and fall can be grazed in the summer to provide a maintenance ration for ewes if their lambs are weaned early. Moderate grazing (57-99 sheep days/ha) in early or late summer did not change vegetative composition or yields. Heavy grazing (185-198 sheep days/ha) in the early summer decreased yields of grasses and the cushion-forb Hoods phlox. Late summer grazing did not change the grass or forb yields. Sagebrush yields increased in the sagebrush subtype where balsamroot was abundant under early summer grazing.
    • The Occurrence of Anagyrine in a Collection of Western American Lupines

      Davis, A. M. (Society for Range Management, 1982-01-01)
      The alkaloid anagyrine found in some Lupinus species has been shown to cause the teratogenic condition known as "crooked calf disease." A collection of western American lupines held by the Western Regional Plant Introduction Station was grown at Pullman, Washington, to determine the extent and levels of anagyrine in these accessions. The plants were field grown on Tucannon soil, a fine-silty, mixed, mesic pachic Haploxerolls. Anagyrine determinations were made by gas/liquid chromatography. Accessions that were positive for anagyrine in June 1977 were resampled and verified in 1978. Anagyrine and total alkaloids were higher in April and markedly diminished by July. Seeds were higher in total alkaloids and anagyrine, when present, than was mature vegetation.
    • The Persistence of Fenitrothion Insecticide In Red Maple (Acer rubrum L.) and White Birch (Betula papyfifera (Marsh.)) Deer Browse

      Lapierre, L. E. (Society for Range Management, 1982-01-01)
      From May 15 to November 15, 1977, vegetation plots were monitered on a constant basis in order to obtain the concentration of fenitrothion in red maple and white birch deer browse. The data obtained indicates that the concentrations tend to be as high as 21.413 ppm for the red maple and 19.371 ppm for the white birch immediately following the spray application. However, the concentrations are below 0.010 ppm 120 days following the application. Fenitroxon was detected in two of the samples taken from the sprayed plots. None was detected within the control plots. There is no evidence in the literature that a concentration of fenitrothion of the magnitude detected would have obvious effects on deer populations during their winter yarding.
    • Vegetative and Reproductive Growth of Bluebunch Wheatgrass in Interior British Columbia

      Quinton, D. A.; McLean, A.; Stout, D. G. (Society for Range Management, 1982-01-01)
      Vegetative and reproductive growth of bluebunch wheatgrass in interior British Columbia has been documented for a 3-year period. Plants began growing immediately after snow melt in the spring, with measurable growth occurring where soils had warmed to 6 +/- 0.5 degrees C at 10-cm depths. Growth ceased from 7 May to 15 July and plants fully matured from 7 July to 10 August with actual dates for each particular site being dependent upon the local microclimate. Fall regrowth was not predictable, occurring only during 1973. Seed production was erratic, unpredictable from our data, and not of sufficient magnitude to sustain the grass population if improper grazing is allowed.