• Spring Food Habits of White-tailed Deer in the South Texas Plains

      Everitt, J. H.; Drawe, D. L. (Society for Range Management, 1974-01-01)
      During the spring seasons of 1970 and 1971, rumen analyses were used to determine food preferences of white-tailed deer on the H. B. Zachry Randado Ranch in South Texas. A total of 83 plant taxa were found to be eaten by this deer herd. Forbs comprised an average of 37.1% by volume of the diet, browse 33.1%, and cacti 17.5%, while grass comprised only 2.5% volume of the diet. Pricklypear cactus was heavily consumed and comprised an average of 15.4% of the total diet. Forbs were most heavily utilized in early spring. Perennial species were more prevalent than annuals in the diet. Important differences occurred in the diet between years, between early and late spring, and between the three major range sites on the study area.
    • The Zootic Disclimax Concept

      Beetle, A. A. (Society for Range Management, 1974-01-01)
      Some ecologists are using the term "zootic climax" in the same sense that range managers use the term "zootic disclimax." If our national parks are to be managed in order that they be natural, it will be important for administrators to understand these two terms and how they differ from the Climatic Climax.
    • Using a Grid to Estimate Production and Utilization of Shrubs

      Springfield, H. W. (Society for Range Management, 1974-01-01)
      Production of fourwing saltbush plants was estimated from photographs against a 1-inch grid. All squares partially or completely obscured by plant material were counted. Utilization of several shrub species was estimated from photos taken before and after browsing by deer. With modification, the technique could be used for other species and situations.
    • Winterfat Seeds Viable after 8 Years Refrigerated Storage

      Springfield, H. W. (Society for Range Management, 1974-01-01)
      Five collections of winterfat seeds from New Mexico were stored in cans under refrigeration (34-42 degrees F) and ordinary temperatures (55-95 degrees F). After 8 years of storage, viability ranged from 51 to 80% for the refrigerated seeds, but practically no seeds remained viable under the warmer storage temperatures.