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dc.contributor.authorWilson, Jerome Keaton
dc.contributor.authorRuiz, Laura
dc.contributor.authorDuarte, Jesse
dc.contributor.authorDavidowitz, Goggy
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-06T01:35:25Z
dc.date.available2019-12-06T01:35:25Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-08
dc.identifier.citationWilson, J. K., Ruiz, L., Duarte, J., & Davidowitz, G. (2019). The nutritional landscape of host plants for a specialist insect herbivore. Ecology and Evolution.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2045-7758
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ece3.5730
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/636283
dc.description.abstractNutrition has far-reaching effects on both the ecology and evolution of species. A substantial body of work has examined the role of host plant quality on insect herbivores, with a particular focus on specialist-generalist dynamics, the interaction of growth and other physiological attributes on fitness and tritrophic effects. Measures of plant quality usually involve one or two axes of nutritional space: typically secondary metabolites or elemental proxies (N and C) of protein and carbohydrates, respectively. Here, we describe the nutrient space of seven host plants of the specialist insect herbivore, Manduca sexta, using an approach that measures physiologically relevant sources of nutrition, soluble protein and digestible carbohydrates. We show that plant species differ markedly in their nutrient content, offering developing insect herbivores a range of available nutrient spaces that also depend on the age of the leaves being consumed. The majority of host-plant species produce diets that are suboptimal to the herbivore, likely resulting in varying levels of compensatory feeding for M. sexta to reach target levels of protein to ensure successful growth and development. Low-quality diets can also impact immune function leading to complex patterns of optimization of plant resources that maximizes both growth and the ability to defend from parasitoids and pathogens. This study is the first to quantify the nutrient space of a suite of host plants used by an insect herbivore using physiologically relevant measures of nutrition.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Science Foundation (NSF) [IOS-1053318]; Center for Insect Science National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Excellence in Research and Teaching (PERT) [K12GM000708]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWILEYen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectgeometric frameworken_US
dc.subjectManduca sextaen_US
dc.subjectnutrient spaceen_US
dc.subjectplant nutritionen_US
dc.subjectplant-insect interactionsen_US
dc.titleThe nutritional landscape of host plants for a specialist insect herbivoreen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Nat Resources & Environmen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Neurosci & Cognit Scien_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Entomolen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Ecol & Evolutionary Biolen_US
dc.identifier.journalECOLOGY AND EVOLUTIONen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journalen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
refterms.dateFOA2019-12-06T01:35:25Z


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Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2019 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License.