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dc.contributor.authorThapa, Bhuwan
dc.contributor.authorScott, Christopher A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-06T01:42:22Z
dc.date.available2019-12-06T01:42:22Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-30
dc.identifier.citationThapa, B., & Scott, C. A. (2019). Institutional Strategies for Adaptation to Water Stress in Farmer-Managed Irrigation Systems of Nepal. International Journal of the Commons, 13(2), pp. 892–908. DOI: https://doi.org/10.5334/ijc.901en_US
dc.identifier.issn1875-0281
dc.identifier.doi10.5334/ijc.901
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/636284
dc.description.abstractInstitutions governing common-pool resources have survived decades of global change with mixed performance. However, we have limited knowledge on how local institutions cope with and adapt to combined environmental and socio-economic changes. Using the case of 12 farmer-managed irrigation systems (FMIS) in Central and Western Nepal, this paper explores the institutional coping and adaptation mechanisms to water stress. We find that local irrigation institutions manage water stress using diverse and integrated approaches broadly categorized as structural and operational measures. Structural measures include water-source expansion and infrastructure rehabilitation works whereas water re-allocation and drought continency rules are examples of operational measures. We find that integration of structural and operational measures is more prevalent in highly water-stressed irrigation systems than in less stressed ones. The choice of adaptation strategies has direct implications for agricultural productivity. FMIS that implemented structural measures harvested more crops per year than those systems that adopted only operational strategies or no adaptation strategies. However, the marginal benefit of adopting adaptation measures is particularly pronounced in water-stressed systems. Climate variability and change act as a threat multiplier because they compound the existing threats the FMIS face from social and economic changes. The key to effective integration of structural and operational measures that help FMIS to maintain their productivity during water stress are collective action and governance to overcome biophysical limitations.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUK Government's Department for International Development; International Development Research Centre, Ottawa, Canada; International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD); government of Afghanistan; government of Australia; government of Austria; government of Bangladesh; government of Bhutan; government of China; government of India; government of Myanmar; government of Nepal; government of Norway; government of Pakistan; government of Switzerland; government of United Kingdom; International Water Security Network - Lloyd's Register Foundation (LRF, London, UK), a charitable foundation in the United Kingdom; Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS) at the University of Arizonaen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherUBIQUITY PRESSen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 The Author(s). This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY 4.0).en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectFarmer-managed irrigation systemsen_US
dc.subjectFMISen_US
dc.subjectinstitutionsen_US
dc.subjectresilienceen_US
dc.subjectcommon-pool resource governanceen_US
dc.subjectself-organizationen_US
dc.subjectmountain agricultureen_US
dc.titleInstitutional Strategies for Adaptation to Water Stress in Farmer-Managed Irrigation Systems of Nepalen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalINTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF THE COMMONSen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journalen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.volume13
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage892-908
refterms.dateFOA2019-12-06T01:42:23Z


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Copyright © 2019 The Author(s). This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY 4.0).
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2019 The Author(s). This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (CC-BY 4.0).