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dc.contributor.authorFunk, Chris
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Laura
dc.contributor.authorAlexander, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorPeterson, Pete
dc.contributor.authorBehrangi, Ali
dc.contributor.authorHusak, Greg
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-06T03:22:43Z
dc.date.available2019-12-06T03:22:43Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-29
dc.identifier.citationChris Funk et al 2019 Environ. Res. Lett. 14 115002en_US
dc.identifier.issn1748-9326
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/1748-9326/ab4a6c
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/636305
dc.description.abstractThis study examines wet season droughts using eight products from the Frequent Rainfall Observations on GridS database. The study begins by evaluating wet season precipitation totals and wet day counts at seasonal and decadal time scales. While we find a high level of agreement among the products at a seasonal time scale, evaluations of 10 year variability indicate substantial non-stationary inter-product differences that make the assessment of low-frequency changes difficult, especially in data-sparse regions. Some products, however, appear more reliable than others on decadal time scales. Global time series of dry, middle, and wet region standardized precipitation index time series indicate little coherent change. There is substantial coherence in year-to-year variations in these time series for the better-performing products, likely indicative of skill for monitoring variations at large spatial scales. During the wet season, the data do not appear to indicate widespread global changes in precipitation, reference evapotranspiration (RefET) or Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI) values. These data also do not indicate a global shift towards increasing aridity. Focusing on SPEI values for dry regions during droughts, however, we find modest increases in RefET and decreases in SPEI when wet season precipitation is below normal. Dry region SPEI values during droughts have decreased by −0.2 since the 1990s. The cause of these RefET increases is unclear, and more detailed analysis will be needed to confirm these results. For wet regions, however, the majority of products appear to indicate increases in wet season precipitation, although many products perform poorly in these regions due to limited observation networks, and estimated increases vary substantially. Synopsis: Our analysis indicates a lack of increasing aridity at global scales, issues associated with non-stationary systematic errors, and concerns associated with increases in reference evapotranspiration in global dry regions during droughts.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUS Geological Survey's Drivers of Drought program; USAID Famine Early Warning Systems Network United States Agency for International Development (USAID); USAID/NASA Harvest program; Australian Research Council [CE170100023, DP160103439]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltd. Original content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subjectprecipitationen_US
dc.subjectprecipitation extremesen_US
dc.subjectclimate changeen_US
dc.subjectdroughten_US
dc.subjectevapotranspirationen_US
dc.subjectglobal warmingen_US
dc.subjectsatellite precipitationen_US
dc.titleExploring trends in wet-season precipitation and drought indices in wet, humid and dry regionsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Hydrol & Atmospher Scien_US
dc.identifier.journalENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERSen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access articleen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.volume14
dc.source.issue11
dc.source.beginpage115002
refterms.dateFOA2019-12-06T03:22:44Z


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Copyright © 2019 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltd. Original content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2019 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltd. Original content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence.