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dc.contributor.authorBlonder, Benjamin
dc.contributor.authorSalinas, Norma
dc.contributor.authorPatrick Bentley, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorShenkin, Alexander
dc.contributor.authorChambi Porroa, Percy O
dc.contributor.authorValdez Tejeira, Yolvi
dc.contributor.authorViolle, Cyrille
dc.contributor.authorFyllas, Nikolaos M
dc.contributor.authorGoldsmith, Gregory R
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Robert E
dc.contributor.authorAsner, Gregory P
dc.contributor.authorDíaz, Sandra
dc.contributor.authorEnquist, Brian J
dc.contributor.authorMalhi, Yadvinder
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-13T20:06:10Z
dc.date.available2019-12-13T20:06:10Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-25
dc.identifier.citationBlonder, B., Salinas, N., Patrick Bentley, L., Shenkin, A., Chambi Porroa, P. O., Valdez Tejeira, Y., ... & Asner, G. P. (2017). Predicting trait‐environment relationships for venation networks along an Andes‐Amazon elevation gradient. Ecology, 98(5), 1239-1255.en_US
dc.identifier.issn0012-9658
dc.identifier.pmid28122124
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ecy.1747
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/636379
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding functional trait‐environment relationships (TERs) may improve predictions of community assembly. However, many empirical TERs have been weak or lacking conceptual foundation. TERs based on leaf venation networks may better link individuals and communities via hydraulic constraints. We report measurements of vein density, vein radius, and leaf thickness for more than 100 dominant species occurring in ten forest communities spanning a 3,300 m Andes‐Amazon elevation gradient in Peru. We use these data to measure the strength of TERs at community scale and to determine whether observed TERs are similar to those predicted by physiological theory. We found strong support for TERs between all traits and temperature, as well weaker support for a predicted TER between maximum abundance‐weighted leaf transpiration rate and maximum potential evapotranspiration. These results provide one approach for developing a more mechanistic trait‐based community assembly theory.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUK Natural Environment Research Council [NE/J023418/1, NE/M019160/1]; European Research Council [321131, 291585]; John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation; United States National Science Foundation [DEB-1209287]; National Science Foundation [DEB-1146206, Macrosystems-1065861, DEB-1457812]; Jackson Foundation; Leverhulme Trust (UK); Inter-American Institute for Global Change Research; FONCyT; CONICET (Argentina); European Community [290605, 221060]; European Research Council (ERC) [StG-2014-639706-CONSTRAINTS]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWILEY-BLACKWELLen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2017 by the Ecological Society of Americaen_US
dc.subjectAmazon basinen_US
dc.subjectAndesen_US
dc.subjectabundance-weightingen_US
dc.subjectcommunity assemblyen_US
dc.subjectcommunity-weighted meanen_US
dc.subjectconductanceen_US
dc.subjectenvironmental filteringen_US
dc.subjectfunctional traiten_US
dc.subjectleaf thicknessen_US
dc.subjecttrait-environment relationshipen_US
dc.subjectvein densityen_US
dc.subjectvein radiusen_US
dc.titlePredicting trait-environment relationships for venation networks along an Andes-Amazon elevation gradienten_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biolen_US
dc.identifier.journalECOLOGYen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleEcology
refterms.dateFOA2019-12-13T20:06:10Z


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