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dc.contributor.authorGordon, Judith S.
dc.contributor.authorBell, Melanie L
dc.contributor.authorArmin, Julie
dc.contributor.authorGiacobbi, Peter, Jr.
dc.contributor.authorNair, Uma S
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-07T21:42:35Z
dc.date.available2020-01-07T21:42:35Z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/636456
dc.descriptionThis article is under review at Translational Behavioral Medicine, published by Oxford University Press.en_US
dc.description.abstractBackground: Evidence supports the use of guided imagery for smoking cessation; however, scalable delivery methods are needed to make it a viable approach. Telephone-based tobacco quitlines are a standard of care, but reach is limited. Adding guided imagery to quitline services might increase reach by offering an alternative approach. Purpose: We developed and tested the feasibility and potential impact of a guided imagery-based tobacco cessation intervention delivered using a quitline model. Methods: Participants for this randomized feasibility trial were recruited statewide through a quitline or community-based methods. Participants were randomized to guided imagery Intervention Condition (IC) or active behavioral Control Condition (CC). After withdrawals, there were 105 participants (IC=56; CC=49). The IC consisted of 6 sessions in which participants created guided imagery audio files. The CC used a standard 6-session behavioral protocol. Feasibility measures included recruitment rate, retention, and adherence to treatment. We also assessed 6-month quit rates and consumer satisfaction. Results: Both the IC and CC protocols were feasible to deliver. We finalized protocols and materials for participants, coaches and study staff, and delivered the protocols with fidelity. We developed successful recruitment methods, and experienced high retention (6 months=81.9%) and adherence (all sessions=66.7%). Long-term quit rates (IC=27.9%; CC=38.1%) compared favorably to those of quitlines, and program satisfaction was high, suggesting that the protocols are acceptable to smokers and may contribute to smoking abstinence. Conclusions: The guided imagery intervention is feasible and promising, suggesting that a fully-powered RCT to test the efficacy of the intervention is warranted.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute of Complementary and Integrative Health Grant #R34AT008947en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 by the authors.en_US
dc.subjectTobaccoen_US
dc.subjectSmokingen_US
dc.subjectCessationen_US
dc.subjectInterventionen_US
dc.subjectGuided Imageryen_US
dc.subjectTelephoneen_US
dc.subjectQuitlineen_US
dc.titleA Telephone-Based Guided Imagery Tobacco Cessation Intervention: Results of a Randomized Feasibility Trialen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Mel & Enid Zuckerman Coll Publ Hlthen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Nursingen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Epidemiol & Biostaten_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Med, Family & Community Meden_US
dc.identifier.journalen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionOriginal manuscripten_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-01-07T21:42:35Z


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