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dc.contributor.authorTrivedi, Michelle
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Janki
dc.contributor.authorHoque, Shushmita
dc.contributor.authorMizrahi, Raphael
dc.contributor.authorBiebel, Kathleen
dc.contributor.authorPhipatanakul, Wanda
dc.contributor.authorLemon, Stephenie C
dc.contributor.authorByatt, Nancy
dc.contributor.authorGerald, Lynn B
dc.contributor.authorRosal, Milagros
dc.contributor.authorPbert, Lori
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-17T19:22:35Z
dc.date.available2020-01-17T19:22:35Z
dc.date.issued2019-12-19
dc.identifier.citationTrivedi, M, Patel, J, Hoque, S, et al. Alignment of stakeholder agendas to facilitate the adoption of school‐supervised asthma therapy. Pediatric Pulmonology. 2019; 1– 11. https://doi.org/10.1002/ppul.24611en_US
dc.identifier.issn8755-6863
dc.identifier.pmid31856415
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ppul.24611
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/636493
dc.description.abstractBackground School-supervised inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy improves pediatric asthma medication adherence, outcomes, and morbidity. However, school-supervised ICS therapy has not been widely adopted into practice. We developed Asthma Link (TM) as a sustainable, low-cost model of school-supervised asthma therapy, designed for real-world adoption. Initial outcomes of Asthma Link (TM) demonstrated a significant improvement in health outcomes. Objective In this study, we examined the perspectives of Asthma Link (TM) participants to identify systems-level barriers and facilitators to refine the Asthma Link (TM) protocol and facilitate real-world uptake of school-supervised asthma therapy. Methods Using qualitative research methods, we interviewed 29 participants in Asthma Link (TM) from 2016 to 2018. Semi-structured interviews were conducted over the phone. Interviews were transcribed and the transcripts were coded to identify major themes within and across stakeholder groups. Results Stakeholders agreed on many facilitators for successful Asthma Link (TM) execution including the brief and easy to follow procedures and the perceived beneficial health impacts for children involved. Some of the barriers identified were deviations from the protocol and insurance companies denying coverage for two inhalers. However, the participants did propose solutions to address these barriers. Conclusion Asthma Link (TM) is a low-cost, sustainable model of school-supervised asthma therapy that leverages the established infrastructure and collaboration of medical providers, school staff, and families. In this study, we elicited the perspectives from these stakeholder groups and identified an agreement in several facilitators, barriers, and proposed solutions that will ultimately inform refinement of the program protocol and support real-world adoption of Asthma Link (TM) and other similar models.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of HealthUnited States Department of Health & Human ServicesNational Institutes of Health (NIH) - USA [KL2TR001454, UL1TR001453-01, K24AI108622]en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWILEYen_US
dc.rights© 2019 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.en_US
dc.subjectdaily inhaled corticosteroiden_US
dc.subjectpediatric asthmaen_US
dc.subjectqualitative studyen_US
dc.subjectstakeholder perspectivesen_US
dc.titleAlignment of stakeholder agendas to facilitate the adoption of school-supervised asthma therapyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Mel & Enid Zuckerman Coll Publ Hlth, Dept Hlth Promot Scien_US
dc.identifier.journalPEDIATRIC PULMONOLOGYen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published online: 19 December 2019en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitlePediatric pulmonology


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