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dc.contributor.advisorDaly, Patricia
dc.contributor.authorCarrig, Johnna Marie
dc.creatorCarrig, Johnna Marie
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-21T17:32:15Z
dc.date.available2020-01-21T17:32:15Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/636546
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this quality improvement project was to: 1) assess compassion fatigue (CF) of emergency nurse practitioners (ENPs) working in a level-one trauma center, 2) determine the effectiveness, 3) feasibility and, 4) usability of a mobile application designed to reduce CF. Background: CF is a hazard for all members of the emergency department (ED) team, especially providers. There is a gap in the literature regarding prevalence of CF in ENPs. Additionally, the number of ED visits is continuously rising. The resulting demand and time-pressure on ED providers has led to CF with debilitating effects, causing some providers to quit. To limit further provider shortages, the well-being of our providers must be addressed. Self-care has been recognized as the most significant protective measure for CF. With the success of smartphone applications in reducing provider CF, a mobile self-care application serves as a modernized, feasible approach to combat CF in the underrepresented ENP population. Methods: Professional Quality of Life (ProQOL) scores, indicative of CF, were measured surrounding the 30-day use of a self-care mobile application, Provider Resilience. After consenting and completing a demographic questionnaire, participants received an application overview. This included guidance with downloading the application on their mobile device, completing the initial ProQOL, and setting a preferred time for self-assessment reminders. Following 30 days of application use, a repeat ProQOL was administered along with the End User Experience Survey. Repeat ProQOLs were administered at one- and three-weeks post-implementation to measure sustainability. Outcomes: After 30 days of application use, ProQOL scores improved, specifically in the burnout subscale. Participants’ mean burnout decreased by 1.0 from baseline to the three-week sustainability measure. Participants’ mean compassion satisfaction improved by 0.9 from baseline to the three-week sustainability measure, while secondary traumatic stress returned to baseline. In regards to mobile application feasibility and usability, all participants used the mobile application at least one to two times per week and 88% of the participants rated the ProQOL ratings as ‘Easy to Use/Beneficial.’ Clinical Implication: This project employs a feasible, user-friendly, effective strategy to limit ENP CF, further promoting provider self-regulation, retention, and high-quality patient care delivery.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction, presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.subjectCompassion Fatigue
dc.subjectEmergency Nurse Practitioners
dc.subjectMobile Application
dc.subjectMobile Self-Care
dc.subjectProfessional Quality of Life
dc.subjectSelf-Care
dc.titleLimiting Emergency Nurse Practitioner Compassion Fatigue Using Mobile Self-Care Reminders
dc.typetext
dc.typeElectronic Dissertation
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizona
thesis.degree.leveldoctoral
dc.contributor.committeememberLarson, Wanda J.
dc.contributor.committeememberCarrington, Jane M.
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate College
thesis.degree.disciplineNursing
thesis.degree.nameD.N.P.
refterms.dateFOA2020-01-21T17:32:15Z


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