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dc.contributor.authorEastoe, Christopher J.
dc.contributor.authorWright, William E.
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-01T00:15:36Z
dc.date.available2020-02-01T00:15:36Z
dc.date.issued2019-10-28
dc.identifier.citationEastoe, C.J.; Wright, W.E. Hydrology of Mountain Blocks in Arizona and New Mexico as Revealed by Isotopes in Groundwater and Precipitation. Geosciences 2019, 9, 461.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2076-3263
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/geosciences9110461
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/636837
dc.description.abstractMountain-block groundwater in the Southern Basin-and-Range Province shows a variety of patterns of delta O-18 and delta H-2 that indicate multiple recharge mechanisms. At 2420 m above sea level (masl) in Tucson Basin, seasonal amount-weighted means of delta O-18 and delta H-2 for summer are -8.3, -53 parts per thousand, and for winter, -10.8 and -70 parts per thousand, respectively. Elevation-effect coefficients for delta O-18 and delta H-2 are as follows: summer, -1.6 and -7.7 parts per thousand per km and winter, -1.1 and -8.9 parts per thousand per km. Little altitude effect exists in 25% of seasons studied. At 2420 masl, amount-weighted monthly averages of delta O-18 and delta H-2 decrease in summer but increase in winter as precipitation intensity increases. In snow-banks, delta O-18 and delta H-2 commonly plots close to the winter local meteoric water line (LMWL). Four principal patterns of (delta O-18, delta H-2) data have been identified: (1) data plotting along LMWLs for all precipitation at >1800 masl; (2) data plotting along modified LMWLs for the wettest 30% of months at <1700 masl; (3) evaporation trends at all elevations; (4) other patterns, including those affected by ancient groundwater. Young, tritiated groundwater predominates in studied mountain blocks. Ancient groundwater forms separate systems and mixes with young groundwater. Recharge mechanisms reflect a complex interplay of precipitation season, altitude, precipitation intensity, groundwater age and geology. Tucson Basin alluvium receives mountain-front recharge containing 50%-90% winter precipitation.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipU.S. National Parks Serviceen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMDPIen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).en_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectNew Mexicoen_US
dc.subjecthydrologyen_US
dc.subjectmountain blocken_US
dc.subjectrechargeen_US
dc.subjectstable isotopesen_US
dc.subjecttritiumen_US
dc.subjectcarbon-14en_US
dc.titleHydrology of Mountain Blocks in Arizona and New Mexico as Revealed by Isotopes in Groundwater and Precipitationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Geoscien_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Lab Tree Ring Resen_US
dc.identifier.journalGEOSCIENCESen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journalen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.volume9
dc.source.issue11
dc.source.beginpage461
refterms.dateFOA2020-02-01T00:15:36Z


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