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dc.contributor.authorBesla, G.
dc.contributor.authorPeter, A.H.G.
dc.contributor.authorGaravito-Camargo, N.
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-10T20:53:57Z
dc.date.available2020-02-10T20:53:57Z
dc.date.issued2019-11-13
dc.identifier.citationG. Besla et al JCAP11(2019)013en_US
dc.identifier.issn1475-7516
dc.identifier.doi10.1088/1475-7516/2019/11/013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/636995
dc.description.abstractUsing N-body simulations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC's) passage through the Milky Way (MW), tailored to reproduce observed kinematic properties of both galaxies, we show that the high-speed tail of the Solar Neighborhood dark matter distribution is overwhelmingly of LMC origin. Two populations contribute at high speeds: 1) Particles that were once bound to the LMC, and 2) MW halo particles that have been accelerated owing to the response of the halo to the recent passage of the LMC. These particles reach speeds of 700-900 km/s with respect to the Earth, near or somewhat higher that the local escape speed of the MW. The high-speed particles follow trajectories similar to the Solar reflex motion, with peak velocities reached in June. For low-mass dark matter, these high-speed particles can dominate the signal in direct-detection experiments, extending the reach of the experiments to lower mass and elastic scattering cross sections even with existing data sets. Our study shows that even non-disrupted MW satellite galaxies can leave a significant dark matter footprint in the Solar Neighborhood.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 The Author(s). Published by IOP Publishing Ltd on behalf of Sissa Medialab. Original content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence. Any further distribution of this work must maintain attribution to the author(s) and the title of the work, journal citation and DOI.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://iopscience.iop.org/info/page/text-and-data-mining
dc.subjectdark matter experimentsen_US
dc.subjectdark matter theoryen_US
dc.subjectdwarfs galaxiesen_US
dc.subjectgalaxy dynamicsen_US
dc.titleThe highest-speed local dark matter particles come from the Large Magellanic Clouden_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Steward Observen_US
dc.identifier.journalJOURNAL OF COSMOLOGY AND ASTROPARTICLE PHYSICSen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access articleen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics
dc.source.volume2019
dc.source.issue11
dc.source.beginpage013
dc.source.endpage013
refterms.dateFOA2020-02-10T20:53:58Z


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