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dc.contributor.authorHahn, Erin E.
dc.contributor.authorKlimova, Anastasia
dc.contributor.authorMunguía-Vega, Adrián
dc.contributor.authorClark, Kevin B.
dc.contributor.authorCulver, Melanie
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-12T20:01:10Z
dc.date.available2020-02-12T20:01:10Z
dc.date.issued2020-01
dc.identifier.citationHahn, E.E., Klimova, A., Munguía-Vega, A., Clark, K.B. and Culver, M. (2020), Use of Museum Specimens to Refine Historical Pronghorn Subspecies Boundaries. Jour. Wild. Mgmt.. doi:10.1002/jwmg.21810en_US
dc.identifier.issn0022-541X
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/jwmg.21810
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/636999
dc.description.abstractEndangered Sonoran (Antilocapra americana sonoriensis) and Peninsular (A. a. peninsularis) pronghorn persist largely because of captive breeding and reintroduction efforts. Recovery team managers want to re-establish pronghorn in their native range, but there is currently uncertainty regarding the subspecies status of extinct pronghorn populations that historically inhabited southern California, USA, and northern Baja California, Mexico. To address this uncertainty, we genotyped museum specimens and conducted phylogenetic and population genetic analyses of historical data in the context of 3 contemporary pronghorn populations. The historical northern Baja California pronghorn share the most ancestry with contemporary Peninsular pronghorn, whereas pronghorn in southern California share more ancestry with contemporary American (A. a. americana) pronghorn. For reintroductions into northern Baja California, the Peninsular subspecies is more appropriate based on museum genetic data. For reintroductions into Southern California, ecological and genetic factors are both important, as the subspecies most genetically related to historical populations (American) may not be well-adapted to the hot, low-elevation deserts of the reintroduction area. (c) 2019 The Wildlife Society.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherWILEYen_US
dc.rights© 2019 The Wildlife Societyen_US
dc.rights.urihttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor
dc.subjectAntilocapra americanaen_US
dc.subjectArizonaen_US
dc.subjectBaja Californiaen_US
dc.subjectCaliforniaen_US
dc.subjectendangered speciesen_US
dc.subjectmicrosatellitesen_US
dc.subjectpopulation geneticsen_US
dc.subjectpronghornen_US
dc.subjectreintroductionen_US
dc.subjectsubspeciesen_US
dc.titleUse of Museum Specimens to Refine Historical Pronghorn Subspecies Boundariesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1937-2817
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Grad Interdisciplinary Program Geneten_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Nat Resources & Environmen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, US Geol Survey, Sch Nat Resources & Environmen_US
dc.identifier.journalJOURNAL OF WILDLIFE MANAGEMENTen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published online: 1 January 2020en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitleThe Journal of Wildlife Management


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