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dc.contributor.advisorSheridan, Thomas E.
dc.contributor.authorSauer, Christopher Peter
dc.creatorSauer, Christopher Peter
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-13T03:32:23Z
dc.date.available2020-02-13T03:32:23Z
dc.date.issued2019-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/637040
dc.description.abstractThe Seri indigenous people of Mexico have been living in the desert along the Sea of Cortés for thousands of years. Their territory includes the northern most mixed mangrove estuary in Mexico. After reviewing previous literature about the Seri and the estuary, I developed a set of questions and visited their villages for interviews and a field trip. The interview topics included how their family groups are defined, what the name was of the group that used to live near the estuary, the status of who is allowed to perform songs and explain traditions, and what environmental changes they have seen at the estuary. Theories about the connection between oral history, oral tradition, and historical events, provided a framework to examine what they told me. To provide another view of this estuary, I created a Normalized Data Vegetation Index using satellite imagery from the years 2000 to 2018 that provides information about the mangrove vegetation. Instead of only being research subjects, the communities in which anthropologists engage can be considered partners. Since some of the Seri are trained paraecologists, this vegetation index will be presented to them to help in their environmental observations.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.titlePRECIOUS MANGROVE: AN ETHNOGRAPHY OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESILIENCEen_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
thesis.degree.levelbachelorsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHonors Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnthropologyen_US
thesis.degree.nameB.A.en_US
refterms.dateFOA2020-02-13T03:32:24Z


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