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dc.contributor.authorLisnerová, Martina
dc.contributor.authorFiala, Ivan
dc.contributor.authorCantatore, Delfina
dc.contributor.authorIrigoitia, Manuel
dc.contributor.authorTimi, Juan
dc.contributor.authorPecková, Hana
dc.contributor.authorBartošová-Sojková, Pavla
dc.contributor.authorSandoval, Christian M
dc.contributor.authorLuer, Carl
dc.contributor.authorMorris, Jack
dc.contributor.authorHolzer, Astrid S
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-25T18:07:06Z
dc.date.available2020-03-25T18:07:06Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-01
dc.identifier.citationLisnerová, M.; Fiala, I.; Cantatore, D.; Irigoitia, M.; Timi, J.; Pecková, H.; Bartošová-Sojková, P.; Sandoval, C.M.; Luer, C.; Morris, J.; Holzer, A.S. Mechanisms and Drivers for the Establishment of Life Cycle Complexity in Myxozoan Parasites. Biology 2020, 9, 10.en_US
dc.identifier.issn2079-7737
dc.identifier.pmid31906274
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/biology9010010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/638064
dc.description.abstractIt is assumed that complex life cycles in cnidarian parasites belonging to the Myxozoa result from incorporation of vertebrates into simple life cycles exploiting aquatic invertebrates. However, nothing is known about the driving forces and implementation of this event, though it fostered massive diversification. We performed a comprehensive search for myxozoans in evolutionary ancient fishes (Chondrichthyes), and more than doubled existing 18S rDNA sequence data, discovering seven independent phylogenetic lineages. We performed cophylogenetic and character mapping methods in the largest monophyletic dataset and demonstrate that host and parasite phylogenies are strongly correlated, and that tectonic changes may explain phylogeographic clustering in recent skates and softnose skates, in the Atlantic. The most basal lineages of myxozoans inhabit the bile of chondrichthyans, an immunologically privileged site and protective niche, easily accessible from the gut via the bile duct. We hypothesize that feed-integration is a likely mechanism of host acquisition, an idea supported by feeding habits of chimaeras and ancient sharks and by multiple entries of different parasite lineages from invertebrates into the new host group. We provide exciting first insights into the early evolutionary history of ancient metazoan parasites in a host group that embodies more evolutionary distinctiveness than most other vertebrates.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherMDPIen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).en_US
dc.subjectChondrichthyesen_US
dc.subjectcnidariaen_US
dc.subjectco-diversificationen_US
dc.subjectco-phylogenyen_US
dc.subjectfeed-integrationen_US
dc.subjectmigrationen_US
dc.subjectmyxozoaen_US
dc.subjectphylogeographyen_US
dc.titleMechanisms and Drivers for the Establishment of Life Cycle Complexity in Myxozoan Parasitesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Undergrad Biol Res Program UBRCen_US
dc.identifier.journalBIOLOGY-BASELen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journalen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleBiology
dc.source.volume9
dc.source.issue1
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-25T18:07:09Z
dc.source.countrySwitzerland


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