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dc.contributor.authorLeBaron, Ashley B.
dc.contributor.authorCurran, Melissa A.
dc.contributor.authorLi, Xiaomin
dc.contributor.authorDew, Jeffrey P.
dc.contributor.authorSharp, Trevor K.
dc.contributor.authorBarnett, Melissa A.
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-25T20:32:12Z
dc.date.available2020-03-25T20:32:12Z
dc.date.issued2020-02-05
dc.identifier.citationLeBaron, A.B., Curran, M.A., Li, X. et al. Financial Stressors as Catalysts for Relational Growth: Bonadaptation Among Lower-Income, Unmarried Couples. J Fam Econ Iss (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10834-020-09666-zen_US
dc.identifier.issn1058-0476
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10834-020-09666-z
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/638072
dc.description.abstractThe FAAR model (Patterson in Fam Syst Med 6(2):202-237, 1988) posits that following a stressor, demands, capabilities, and meanings can contribute to bonadaptation (i.e., adaptation that promotes wellbeing). The purpose of the current study is to test how financial and relational demands, capabilities, and meanings are associated with relationship commitment and coparenting (i.e., bonadaptation) following a financial stressor. We used data from the Building Strong Families (BSF) sample (i.e., primarily lower-income, unmarried couples; N = 1396). First, results showed that predictors of coparenting were more numerous than predictors of commitment. Second, all facets of the FAAR model-demands, capabilities, and meanings-were evident as predictors of bonadaptation. Finally, comparing the results with the results of a previous paper (i.e., a nationally-representative sample of married couples; Dew et al. in J Fam Econ Issues 39(3):405-421, 2018), relationship maintenance behaviors and financial support were capabilities for both samples, whereas other capabilities and meanings were context-specific (e.g., relational support significant in Dew et al. sample but not BSF sample). These patterns suggest that although some of the avenues to bonadaptation may differ depending on the sample, it is possible for couples to thrive not just in spite of financial stressors but even because of them; that is, financial stressors can serve as catalysts for positive relational growth.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherSPRINGER INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING AGen_US
dc.rights© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2020.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectBonadaptationen_US
dc.subjectCommitmenten_US
dc.subjectCoparentingen_US
dc.subjectFinancial stressen_US
dc.subjectFAAR modelen_US
dc.titleFinancial Stressors as Catalysts for Relational Growth: Bonadaptation Among Lower-Income, Unmarried Couplesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1573-3475
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.journalJOURNAL OF FAMILY AND ECONOMIC ISSUESen_US
dc.description.note12 month embargo; published online: 5 February 2020en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Family and Economic Issues


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