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dc.contributor.authorTuschhoff, E J
dc.contributor.authorHutter, Carl R
dc.contributor.authorGlor, Richard E
dc.date.accessioned2020-03-30T20:37:51Z
dc.date.available2020-03-30T20:37:51Z
dc.date.issued2020-02-13
dc.identifier.citationTuschhoff EJ, Hutter CR, Glor RE. 2020. Improving sustainable use of genetic resources in biodiversity archives. PeerJ 8:e8369 https://doi.org/10.7717/peerj.8369en_US
dc.identifier.issn2167-8359
dc.identifier.pmid32095317
dc.identifier.doi10.7717/peerj.8369
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/638088
dc.description.abstractTissue sample databases housed in biodiversity archives represent a vast trove of genetic resources, and these tissues are often destructively subsampled and provided to researchers for DNA extractions and subsequent sequencing. While obtaining a sufficient quantity of DNA for downstream applications is vital for these researchers, it is also important to preserve tissue resources for future use given that the original material is destructively and consumptively sampled with each use. It is therefore necessary to develop standardized tissue subsampling and loaning procedures to ensure that tissues are being used efficiently. In this study, we specifically focus on the efficiency of DNA extraction methods by using anuran liver and muscle tissues maintained at a biodiversity archive. We conducted a series of experiments to test whether current practices involving coarse visual assessments of tissue size are effective, how tissue mass correlates with DNA yield and concentration, and whether the amount of DNA recovered is correlated with sample age. We found that tissue samples between 2 and 8 mg resulted in the most efficient extractions, with tissues at the lower end of this range providing more DNA per unit mass and tissues at the higher end of this range providing more total DNA. Additionally, we found no correlation between tissue age and DNA yield. Because we find that even very small tissue subsamples tend to yield far more DNA than is required by researchers for modern sequencing applications (including whole genome shotgun sequencing), we recommend that biodiversity archives consider dramatically improving sustainable use of their archived material by providing researchers with set quantities of extracted DNA rather than with the subsampled tissues themselves.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherPEERJ INCen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020 Tuschhoff et al.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectBiodiversityen_US
dc.subjectBiological collectionsen_US
dc.subjectDNA extractionen_US
dc.subjectGenetic resourcesen_US
dc.subjectHerpetologyen_US
dc.subjectSustainabilityen_US
dc.subjectTissue samplingen_US
dc.titleImproving sustainable use of genetic resources in biodiversity archivesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Ecol & Evolutionary Biolen_US
dc.identifier.journalPEERJen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access journalen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitlePeerJ
dc.source.volume8
dc.source.beginpagee8369
dc.source.endpage
refterms.dateFOA2020-03-30T20:37:54Z
dc.source.countryUnited States


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