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dc.contributor.authorHoylman, Zachary H.
dc.contributor.authorJencso, Kelsey G.
dc.contributor.authorHu, Jia
dc.contributor.authorHolden, Zachary A.
dc.contributor.authorAllred, Brady
dc.contributor.authorDobrowski, Solomon
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, Nathaniel
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Justin T.
dc.contributor.authorAffleck, David
dc.contributor.authorSeielstad, Carl
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-14T17:01:08Z
dc.date.available2020-04-14T17:01:08Z
dc.date.issued2019-12-23
dc.identifier.citationHoylman, Z. H., Jencso, K. G., Hu, J.,Holden, Z. A., Allred, B., Dobrowski, S.,et al. (2019). The topographic signature of ecosystem climate sensitivity in the western United States. Geophysical Research Letters, 46, 14,508-14,520 https://doi.org/10.1029/2019GL085546en_US
dc.identifier.issn0094-8276
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2019gl085546
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/640972
dc.description.abstractIt has been suggested that hillslope topography can produce hydrologic refugia, sites where ecosystem productivity is relatively insensitive to climate variation. However, the ecological impacts and spatial distribution of these sites are poorly resolved across gradients in climate. We quantified the response of ecosystem net primary productivity to changes in the annual climatic water balance for 30 years using pixel-specific linear regression (30-m resolution) across the western United States. The standardized slopes of these models represent ecosystem climate sensitivity and provide a means to identify drought-resistant ecosystems. Productive and resistant ecosystems were most frequent in convergent hillslope positions, especially in semiarid climates. Ecosystems in divergent positions were moderately resistant to climate variability, but less productive relative to convergent positions. This topographic effect was significantly dampened in hygric and xeric climates. In aggregate, spatial patterns of ecosystem sensitivity can be implemented for regional planning to maximize conservation in landscapes more resistant to perturbations.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAMER GEOPHYSICAL UNIONen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019. The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en_US
dc.titleThe Topographic Signature of Ecosystem Climate Sensitivity in the Western United Statesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Sch Nat Resources & Environmen_US
dc.identifier.journalGEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERSen_US
dc.description.noteOpen Access Articleen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.identifier.pii10.1029/2019GL085546
dc.source.journaltitleGeophysical Research Letters
dc.source.volume46
dc.source.issue24
dc.source.beginpage14508
dc.source.endpage14520
refterms.dateFOA2020-04-14T17:01:11Z


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Copyright © 2019. The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2019. The Authors. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.