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dc.contributor.authorTian, Jingjing
dc.contributor.authorDong, Xiquan
dc.contributor.authorXi, Baike
dc.contributor.authorFeng, Zhe
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-15T16:48:35Z
dc.date.available2020-04-15T16:48:35Z
dc.date.issued2020-02-21
dc.identifier.citationCharacteristics of Ice Cloud–Precipitation of Warm Season Mesoscale Convective Systems over the Great Plains: Journal of Hydrometeorology: Vol 21, No 2. (2020). Retrieved April 14, 2020, from Journal of Hydrometeorology website: https://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/10.1175/JHM-D-19-0176.1 ‌en_US
dc.identifier.issn1525-755X
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/jhm-d-19-0176.1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/640994
dc.description.abstractIn this study, the mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) are tracked using high-resolution radar and satellite observations over the U.S. Great Plains during April-August from 2010 to 2012. The spatiotemporal variability of MCS precipitation is then characterized using the Stage IV product. We found that the spatial variability and nocturnal peaks of MCS precipitation are primarily driven by the MCS occurrence rather than the precipitation intensity. The tracked MCSs are further classified into convective core (CC), stratiform rain (SR), and anvil clouds regions. The spatial variability and diurnal cycle of precipitation in the SR regions of MCSs are not as significant as those of MCS precipitation. In the SR regions, the high-resolution, long-term ice cloud microphysical properties [ice water content (IWC) and ice water paths (IWPs)] are provided. The IWCs generally decrease with height. Spatially, the IWC, IWP, and precipitation are all higher over the southern Great Plains than over the northern Great Plains. Seasonally, those ice and precipitation properties are all higher in summer than in spring. Comparing the peak timings of MCS precipitation and IWPs from the diurnal cycles and their composite evolutions, it is found that when using the peak timing of IWPSR as a reference, the heaviest precipitation in the MCS convective core occurs earlier, while the strongest SR precipitation occurs later. The shift of peak timings could be explained by the stratiform precipitation formation process. The IWP and precipitation relationships are different at MCS genesis, mature, and decay stages. The relationships and the transition processes from ice particles to precipitation also depend on the low-level humidity.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAMER METEOROLOGICAL SOCen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020 American Meteorological Society. For information regarding reuse of this content and general copyright information, consult the AMS Copyright Policy (www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicenses).en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://www.ametsoc.org/PUBSReuseLicensesen_US
dc.subjectAtmosphereen_US
dc.subjectNorth Americaen_US
dc.subjectCloud microphysicsen_US
dc.subjectCloudsen_US
dc.subjectRadarsen_US
dc.subjectRadar observationsen_US
dc.titleCharacteristics of Ice Cloud–Precipitation of Warm Season Mesoscale Convective Systems over the Great Plainsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Hydrol & Atmospher Scien_US
dc.identifier.journalJOURNAL OF HYDROMETEOROLOGYen_US
dc.description.note6 month embargo; published online: 21 February 2020en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.identifier.pii10.1175/JHM-D-19-0176.1
dc.source.journaltitleJournal of Hydrometeorology
dc.source.volume21
dc.source.issue2
dc.source.beginpage317
dc.source.endpage334


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