• Yamato 792947,793408 and 82038: The most primitive H chondrites, with abundant refractory inclusions

      Kimura, M.; Hiyagon, H.; Palme, H.; Spettel, B.; Wolf, D.; Clayton, R. N.; Mayeda, T. K.; Sato, T.; Suzuki, A.; Kojima, H. (The Meteoritical Society, 2002-01-01)
      In this paper we report petrological and chemical data of the unusual chondritic meteorites Yamato (Y)-792947, Y-93408 and Y-82038. The three meteorites are very similar in texture and chemical composition, suggesting that they are pieces of a single fall. The whole-rock oxygen isotopes and the chemical compositions are indicative ofH chondrites. In addition, the mineralogy, and the abundances of chondrule types, opaque minerals and matrices suggest that these meteorites are H3 chondrites. They were hardly affected by thermal and shock metamorphism. The degree of weathering is very low. We conclude that these are the most primitive H chondrites, H3.2-3.4 (SI), known to date. On the other hand, these chondrites contain extraordinarily high amounts of refractory inclusions, intermediate between those of ordinary and carbonaceous chondrites. The distribution of the inclusions may have been highly heterogeneous in the primitive solar nebula. The mineralogy, chemistry and oxygen isotopic compositions of inclusions studied here are similar to those in CO and E chondrites.
    • Yamato 86029: Aqueously altered and thermally metamorphosed CI-like chondrite with unusual textures

      Tonui, E. K.; Zolensky, M. E.; Lipschutz, M. E.; Wang, M.-S.; Nakamura, T. (The Meteoritical Society, 2003-01-01)
      We describe the petrologic and trace element characteristics of the Yamato 86029 (Y-86029) meteorite. Y-86029 is a breccia consisting of a variety of clasts, and abundant secondary minerals including coarse- and fine-grained phyllosilicates, Fe-Ni sulfides, carbonates, and magnetite. There are no chondrules, but a few anhydrous olivine-rich grains are present within a very fine-grained phyllosilicate-rich matrix. Analyses of 14 thermally mobile trace elements suggest that Y-86029 experienced moderate, open-system thermal metamorphism. Comparison with data for other heated carbonaceous chondrites suggests metamorphic temperatures of 500-600 degrees C for Y-86029. This is apparent petrographically, in partial dehydration of phyllosilicates to incompletely re-crystallized olivine. This transformation appears to proceed through `intermediate' highly-disordered `poorly crystalline' phases consisting of newly formed olivine and residual desiccated phyllosilicate and their mixtures. Periclase is also present as a possible heating product of Mg-rich carbonate precursors. Y-86029 shows unusual textures rarely encountered in carbonaceous chondrites. The periclase occurs as unusually large Fe-rich clasts (300-500 micrometers). Fine-grained carbonates with uniform texture are also present as small (10-15 micrometers in diameter), rounded to sub-rounded `shells' of ankerite/siderite enclosing magnetite. These carbonates appear to have formed by low temperature aqueous alteration at specific thermal decomposition temperatures consistent with thermodynamic models of carbonate formation. The fine and uniform texture suggests crystallization from a fluid circulating in interconnected spaces throughout entire growth. One isolated aggregate in Y-86029 also consists of a mosaic of polycrystalline olivine aggregates and sulfide blebs typical of shock-induced melt re- crystallization. Except for these unusual textures, the isotopic, petrologic and chemical characteristics of Y- 86029 are quite similar to those of Y-82162, the only other heated CI-like chondrite known. They were probably derived from similar asteroids rather than one asteroid, and hence may not necessarily be paired.
    • Yellow impact glass from the K/T boundary at Beloc (Haiti): XANES determination of the Fe oxidation state and implications for formation conditions

      Giuli, Gabriele; Eeckhout, Sigrid Griet; Koeberl, Christian; Pratesi, Giovanni; Paris, Eleonora (The Meteoritical Society, 2008-01-01)
      We determined the iron oxidation state and coordination number in five samples of yellow impact glass from the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K/T) boundary section at Beloc, Haiti, which formed as the result of impact melting during the Chicxulub impact event. The samples were analyzed by Fe K-edge XANES spectroscopy and the results were compared with published data on eight black impact glasses and one high Si-K impact spherule from the same impact layer. The pre-edge peak of our high-resolution XANES spectra displays evident variations indicative of significant changes in the Fe oxidation state, spanning a wide range from about 75 to 100 mole% Fe3+. Yellow K/T glasses have significantly higher Fe3+/(Fe2+ + Fe3+) ratios compared to black K/T impact glasses (from 20 to 75 mole% Fe3+) and high Si-K glass (20 mole% Fe3+). In particular, all the pre-edge peak data on these three types of impact glasses plot between two mixing lines joining a point calculated as the mean of a group of tektites studied so far (consisting of [4]Fe2+ and [5]Fe2+) to [4]Fe3+ and [5]Fe3+, respectively. Thus, the XANES spectra of the yellow K/T glasses can be interpreted as a mixture of [4]Fe2+, [5]Fe2+, [4]Fe3+, and [5]Fe3+. Our observations can be explained by a very large range of oxygen fugacity conditions during melt formation. Furthermore, there is a clear positive relationship between the Fe3+/(Fe2+ + Fe3+) ratio and the Ca content of these glasses, suggesting that the Fe oxidation state was influenced by the relative contribution of Ca-sulfate-and Ca-carbonate-bearing sedimentary rocks at the impact site.
    • Zoned chondrules in Semarkona: Evidence for high- and low-temperature processing

      Grossman, Jeffrey N.; Alexander, Conel M. O'D.; Wang, Jianhua; Brearley, Adrian J. (The Meteoritical Society, 2002-01-01)
      At least 15% of the low-FeO chondrules in Semarkona (LL3.0) have mesostases that are concentrically zoned in Na, with enrichments near the outer margins. We have studied zoned chondrules using electron microprobe methods (x-ray mapping plus quantitative analysis), ion microprobe analysis for trace elements and hydrogen isotopes, cathodoluminescence imaging, and transmission electron microscopy in order to determine what these objects can tell us about the environment in which chondrules formed and evolved. Mesostases in these chondrules are strongly zoned in all moderately volatile elements and H (interpreted as water). Calcium is depleted in areas of volatile enrichment. Titanium and Cr generally decrease toward the chondrule surfaces, whereas Al and Si may either increase or decrease, generally in opposite directions to one another; Mn follows Na in some chondrules but not in others; Fe and Mg are unzoned. D/H ratios increase in the water-rich areas of zoned chondrules. Mesostasis shows cathodoluminescence zoning in most zoned chondrules, with the brightest yellow color near the outside. Mesostasis in zoned chondrules appears to be glassy, with no evidence for devitrification. Systematic variations in zoning patterns among pyroxene- and olivine-rich chondrules may indicate that fractionation of low- and high-Ca pyroxene played some role in Ti, Cr, Mn, Si, Al, and some Ca zoning. But direct condensation of elements into hot chondrules, secondary melting of late condensates into the outer portions of chondrules, and subsolidus diffusion of elements into warm chondrules cannot account for the sub-parallel zoning profiles of many elements, the presence of H2O, or elemental abundance patterns. Zoning of moderately volatile elements and Ca may have been produced by hydration of chondrule glass without devitrification during aqueous alteration on the parent asteroid. This could have induced structural changes in the glass allowing rapid diffusion and exchange of elements between altered glass and surrounding matrix and rim material. Calcium was mainly lost during this process, and other nonvolatile elements may have been mobile as well. Some unzoned, low-FeO chondrules appear to have fully altered mesostasis.
    • Zoning patterns of Fe and V in spinel from a type B Ca-Al-rich inclusion: Constraints on subsolidus thermal history

      Paque, J. M.; Burnett, D. S.; Beckett, J. R. (The Meteoritical Society, 2007-01-01)
      We obtained two-dimensional concentration maps for the minor elements Fe and V in 21 spinel crystals in the Allende type B1 inclusion TS-34 with a 4-5 micrometer resolution. Locally high concentrations of Fe occur along at least one edge of the spinels and decrease toward the center of the grains. Enrichment in V can also occur along edges or at corners. In general, there is no overall correlation of the Fe and V distributions, but in local regions of two grains, the V and Fe distributions are correlated, strongly suggesting a local source for both elements. In these two grains, opaque assemblages are present that appear to locally control the V distributions. This, coupled with previous work, suggests that prior to alteration, TS-34 contained V-rich metal. Oxidation of this metal during alteration can account for the edge/corner V enrichments, but provide only minor FeO contributions, explaining the overall lack of correlation between Fe and V. Most of the FeO appears to have been externally introduced along spinel boundaries during alteration. These alteration phases served as sources for diffusion of FeO into spinel. FeO distributions in spinel lead to a mean attenuation length of ~8 micrometer and, using literature diffusion coefficients in isothermal and exponential cooling approximations for peak temperatures in the range 600-700 degrees C, this leads to a time scale for calciumaluminum- rich inclusion (CAI) alteration in the range of decades to centuries.