• High resolution temperature measurements in the borehole Yaxcopoil-1, Mexico

      Wilhelm, H.; Heidinger, P.; Šafanda, J.; Čermák, V.; Burkhardt, H.; Popov, Y. (The Meteoritical Society, 2004-01-01)
      Within the frame of the International Continental Deep Drilling Program (ICDP) and as a part of the Chicxulub Scientific Drilling Project (CSDP), high resolution temperature measurements were performed in the borehole Yaxcopoil-1 (Yax-1). The temperature was logged to the depth of 858 m seven times between March 6-19, 2002, starting 10 days after the hole was shut in and mud circulation ceased. Successive logs revealed only small temperature variations in time and space, indicating a fast temperature recovery to almost undisturbed conditions prior to the first log. From these logs, a mean temperature gradient of ~37 mK/m was determined below the uppermost 250 m. Another temperature log was recorded on May 24, 2003 (15 months after the shut in) to a depth of 895 m. The obtained temperature profile is very similar to the 2002 profile, with an insignificantly higher mean gradient below 250 m that may indicate a long-term return to the pre-drilling temperature. The temperature in the uppermost part of the hole bears signs of considerable influence of a convective contribution to the vertical thermal heat transfer. The depth extent of the convection seems to have deepened from 150 m in March 2002 to 230 m in May 2003. Based on the observed temperature gradient and the rock types encountered in the borehole above 670 m, the conducted heat flow is expected to be in the range 65-80 mW/m2.
    • Physical properties of rocks from the upper part of the Yaxcopoil-1 drill hole, Chicxulub crater

      Popov, Y.; Romushkevich, R.; Bayuk, I.; Korobkov, D.; Mayr, S.; Burkhardt, H.; Wilhelm, H. (The Meteoritical Society, 2004-01-01)
      Physical properties were determined in a first step on post-impact tertiary limestones from the depth interval of 404-666 m of the Yaxcopoil-1 (Yax-1) scientific well, drilled in the Chicxulub impact crater (Mexico). Thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, density, and porosity were measured on 120 dry and water-saturated rocks with a core sampling interval of 2-2.5 m. Nondestructive, non-contact optical scanning technology was used for thermal property measurements including thermal anisotropy and inhomogeneity. Supplementary petrophysical properties (acoustic velocities, formation resisitivity factor, internal surface, and hydraulic permeability) were determined on a selected subgroup of representative samples to derive correlations with the densely measured parameters, establishing estimated depth logs to provide calibration values for the interpretation of geophysical data. Significant short- and long-scale variations of porosity (1-37%) turned out to be the dominant factor influencing thermal, acoustic, and hydraulic properties of this post impact limestone formation. Correspondingly, large variations of thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, acoustic velocities, and hydraulic permeability were found. These variations of physical properties allow us to subdivide the formation into several zones. A combination of experimental data on thermal conductivity for dry and water-saturated rocks and a theoretical model of effective thermal conductivity for heterogeneous media have been used to calculate thermal conductivity of mineral skeleton and pore aspect ratio for every core under study. The results on thermal parameters are the necessary basis for the determination of heat flow density, demonstrating the necessity of dense sampling in the case of inhomogeneous rock formations.