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dc.contributor.authorMisra, Shivani
dc.creatorMisra, Shivani
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-17T01:30:53Z
dc.date.available2020-06-17T01:30:53Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/641620
dc.descriptionA Thesis submitted to The University of Arizona College of Medicine - Phoenix in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Medicine.
dc.description.abstractBackground- Almost 70% of infant deaths are associated with head trauma, making traumatic brain injury a leading cause of death and disability in infants. Those who survive have lifelong physical, developmental, and emotional sequelae. As such, efforts to characterize and understand the factors that lead to head trauma in infants is critical. Methods- This was a single-institution, retrospective review of suspected AHT patients from 2010-2017. Data were collected on demographics, hospitalization, injury, family characteristics, socio-behavioral characteristics, physical examination, laboratory findings, imaging, discharge, and other follow-up information on fatal and non-fatal head trauma. Statistical analysis involved descriptive statistics, logistic regression, and receiver operating characteristics. Results- Key risks associated with AHT included bruising (OR: 6.1; 95%CI: 3.5-10.5), multiple fractures (OR: 9.5; 95%CI: 4.2-21.5), unknown method of injury (OR: 3.9; 95%CI: 2.2-7.0), self-reported history of substance abuse (OR: 8.8; 95%CI: 3.0-26.0), prior Child Protective Services reports (OR: 2.1; 95%CI: 1.1-3.9), prior police involvement (OR: 5.3; 95%CI: 2.7- 10.4), domestic violence (OR: 1.3; 95%CI: 1.3-5.5), and unknown number of adults in the home (OR: 4.2; 95%CI: 2.4-7.4). The regression model captured 57% of the variance, was 73% sensitive, and was 90% specific using ROC. Conclusions- We propose to broaden the classification of AHT to include inflicted injury and non-inflicted injury, along with a new category called “traumatic injury from an unexplained Event.” An expanded classification system for AHT would capture abuse, neglect, and undetermined patients, making AHT more useful in surveillance, screening, treatment, and prevention of head injury in very young children.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the College of Medicine - Phoenix, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
dc.subjectPediatrics
dc.subjectGlobal Health
dc.subjecthead trauma
dc.subject.meshPediatrics
dc.titleAssociated Risk of Head Trauma in Child Maltreatment
dc.typetext
dc.typeElectronic Thesis
dc.typePoster
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item is part of the College of Medicine - Phoenix Scholarly Projects 2020 collection. For more information, contact the Phoenix Biomedical Campus Library at pbc-library@email.arizona.edu.
dc.contributor.mentorBeyda, David
refterms.dateFOA2020-06-17T01:30:53Z


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