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dc.contributor.authorBadwal, Areen
dc.contributor.authorBorgstrom, Mark
dc.contributor.authorSamlan, Robin A
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Julie E
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-01T22:15:26Z
dc.date.available2020-07-01T22:15:26Z
dc.date.issued2020-03-12
dc.identifier.citationBadwal, A., Borgstrom, M., Samlan, R. A., & Miller, J. E. (2020). Middle age, a key time point for changes in birdsong and human voice. Behavioral Neuroscience, 134(3), 208–221.en_US
dc.identifier.pmid32162938
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/bne0000363
dc.identifier.doi10.25422/azu.data.12020763.v1
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/641781
dc.description.abstractVoice changes caused by natural aging and neurodegenerative diseases are prevalent in the aging population and diminish quality of life. Most treatments involve behavioral interventions that target the larynx because of a limited understanding of central brain mechanisms. The songbird offers a unique entry point into studying age-related changes in vocalizations because of a well-characterized neural circuitry for song that shares homology to human vocal control areas. Previously we established a translational dictionary for evaluating acoustic features of birdsong in the context of human voice measurements. In the present study. we conduct extensive analyses of birdsongs from young, middle-aged, and old male zebra finches. Our findings show that birdsongs become louder with age, and changes in periodic energy occur at middle age but are transient; songs appear to stabilize in old birds. Furthermore, faster songs are detected in finches at middle age compared with young and old finches. Vocal disorders in humans emerge at middle age, but the underlying brain pathologies are not well identified. The current findings will motivate future investigations using the songbird model to identify possible brain mechanisms involved in human vocal disorders of aging.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipUniversity of Arizona; Undergraduate Biology Research Programen_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherAMER PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOCen_US
dc.relation.urlhttps://arizona.figshare.com/articles/media/Raw_birdsong_data_for_Middle_Age_a_Key_Time_Point_for_Changes_in_Birdsong_and_Human_Voice_/12020763en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020, American Psychological Association.en_US
dc.rights.urihttp://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/en_US
dc.subjectvoiceen_US
dc.subjectspeechen_US
dc.subjectbirdsongen_US
dc.subjectzebra finchen_US
dc.subjectagingen_US
dc.titleMiddle age, a key time point for changes in birdsong and human voiceen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1939-0084
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Neuroscien_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Univ Informat Technol Serven_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Speech Language & Heating Scien_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Speech Languageen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Hearing Scien_US
dc.identifier.journalBehavioral neuroscienceen_US
dc.description.noteSupplementary data available in the University of Arizona Research Data Repositoryen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitleBehavioral neuroscience
dc.source.volume134
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage208
dc.source.endpage221
refterms.dateFOA2020-07-01T22:15:27Z
dc.source.countryUnited States


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