Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorTighe, Caitlan A
dc.contributor.authorYouk, Ada
dc.contributor.authorIbrahim, Said A
dc.contributor.authorWeiner, Debra K
dc.contributor.authorVina, Ernest R
dc.contributor.authorKwoh, C Kent
dc.contributor.authorGallagher, Rollin M
dc.contributor.authorBramoweth, Adam D
dc.contributor.authorHausmann, Leslie R M
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-02T19:49:12Z
dc.date.available2020-07-02T19:49:12Z
dc.date.issued2019-08-22
dc.identifier.citationTighe, C. A., Youk, A., Ibrahim, S. A., Weiner, D. K., Vina, E. R., Kwoh, C. K., ... & Hausmann, L. R. (2020). Pain Catastrophizing and Arthritis Self-Efficacy as Mediators of Sleep Disturbance and Osteoarthritis Symptom Severity. Pain Medicine, 21(3), 501-510.en_US
dc.identifier.issn1526-2375
dc.identifier.pmid31504838
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/pm/pnz187
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/641792
dc.description.abstractObjective. Sleep and pain-related experiences are consistently associated, but the pathways linking these experiences are not well understood. We evaluated whether pain catastrophizing and arthritis self-efficacy mediate the association between sleep disturbance and osteoarthritis (OA) symptom severity in patients with knee OA. Methods. We analyzed cross-sectional baseline data collected from Veterans Affairs (VA) patients enrolled in a clinical trial examining the effectiveness of a positive psychology intervention in managing pain from knee OA. Participants indicated how often in the past two weeks they were bothered by trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or sleeping too much. We used validated scales to assess the primary outcome (OA symptom severity) and potential mediators (arthritis self-efficacy and pain catastrophizing). To test the proposed mediation model, we used parallel multiple mediation analyses with bootstrapping, controlling for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics with bivariate associations with OA symptom severity. Results. The sample included 517 patients (M-age = 64 years, 72.9% male, 52.2% African American). On average, participants reported experiencing sleep disturbance at least several days in the past two weeks (M = 1.41, SD = 1.18) and reported moderate OA symptom severity (M = 48.22, SD = 16.36). More frequent sleep disturbance was associated with higher OA symptom severity directly (b= 3.08, P <0.001) and indirectly, through higher pain catastrophizing (b = 0.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.20 to 1.11) and lower arthritis self-efficacy (b = 0.84, 95% CI = 0.42 to 1.42). Conclusions. Pain catastrophizing and arthritis self-efficacy partially mediated the association between sleep disturbance and OA symptom severity. Behavioral interventions that address pain catastrophizing and/or self-efficacy may buffer the association between sleep disturbance and OA symptom severity.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherOXFORD UNIV PRESSen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2019 American Academy of Pain Medicine. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/mark/1.0/en_US
dc.subjectosteoarthritisen_US
dc.subjectPAINen_US
dc.subjectPain Catastrophizingen_US
dc.subjectSelf-Efficacyen_US
dc.subjectSleepen_US
dc.subjectVeteransen_US
dc.titlePain Catastrophizing and Arthritis Self-Efficacy as Mediators of Sleep Disturbance and Osteoarthritis Symptom Severityen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Coll Meden_US
dc.identifier.journalPAIN MEDICINEen_US
dc.description.notePublic domain articleen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitlePain medicine (Malden, Mass.)
dc.source.volume21
dc.source.issue3
dc.source.beginpage501
dc.source.endpage510
refterms.dateFOA2020-07-02T19:49:13Z
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryEngland


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
pnz187.pdf
Size:
260.7Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Final Published Version

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Copyright © 2019 American Academy of Pain Medicine. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2019 American Academy of Pain Medicine. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.