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dc.contributor.authorFranco, Daniela
dc.contributor.authorZamudio, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorBlevins, Kennedy M
dc.contributor.authorNúñez-Larios, Eric A
dc.contributor.authorRicoy, Ulises M
dc.contributor.authorIñiguez, Sergio D
dc.contributor.authorZavala, Arturo R
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-06T18:35:44Z
dc.date.available2020-07-06T18:35:44Z
dc.date.issued2020-07-01
dc.identifier.citationFranco, D., Zamudio, J., Blevins, K. M., Núñez-Larios, E. A., Ricoy, U. M., Iñiguez, S. D., & Zavala, A. R. (2020). Early-life ketamine exposure attenuates the preference for ethanol in adolescent Sprague-Dawley rats. Behavioural Brain Research, 112626. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbr.2020.112626en_US
dc.identifier.issn0166-4328
dc.identifier.pmid32361040
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bbr.2020.112626
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/641795
dc.description.abstractKetamine, a noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, produces quick and effective antidepressant results in depressed juvenile and adult individuals. The long-term consequences of using ketamine in juvenile populations are not well known, particularly as it affects vulnerability to drugs of abuse later in life, given that ketamine is also a drug of abuse. Thus, the current study examined whether early-life ketamine administration produces long-term changes in the sensitivity to the rewarding effects of ethanol, as measured using the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm. On postnatal day (PD) 21, juvenile male and female rats were pretreated with ketamine (0.0 or 20 mg/kg) for 10 consecutive days (i.e., PD 21-30) and then evaluated for ethanol-induced CPP (0.0, 0.125, 0.5, or 2.0 g/kg) from PD 32 - 39. Results revealed that early-life ketamine administration attenuated the rewarding properties of ethanol in male rats, as ketamine pretreated rats failed to exhibit ethanol-induced CPP at any dose compared to saline pretreated rats, which showed an increased preference towards the ethanol-paired compartment in a dose-dependent manner. In females, ethanol-induced CPP was generally less robust compared to males, but ketamine pretreatment resulted in a rightward shift in the dose-response curve, given that ketamine pretreated rats needed a higher dose of ethanol compared to saline pretreated rats to exhibit ethanol-induced CPP. When considered together, the findings suggest that early use of ketamine does not appear to enhance the vulnerability to ethanol later in life, but in contrast, it may attenuate the rewarding effects of ethanol.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherELSEVIERen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.en_US
dc.subjectAddictionen_US
dc.subjectAdolescenceen_US
dc.subjectalcoholen_US
dc.subjectanhedoniaen_US
dc.subjectCPPen_US
dc.subjectRewarden_US
dc.titleEarly-life ketamine exposure attenuates the preference for ethanol in adolescent Sprague-Dawley ratsen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.eissn1872-7549
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Dept Neuroscien_US
dc.identifier.journalBEHAVIOURAL BRAIN RESEARCHen_US
dc.description.note18 month embargo; published online: 30 April 2020en_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal accepted manuscripten_US
dc.source.journaltitleBehavioural brain research
dc.source.volume389
dc.source.beginpage112626
dc.source.endpage
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryUnited States
dc.source.countryNetherlands


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