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dc.contributor.authorGabriel, Travis S. J.
dc.contributor.authorJackson, Alan P.
dc.contributor.authorAsphaug, Erik
dc.contributor.authorReufer, Andreas
dc.contributor.authorJutzi, Martin
dc.contributor.authorBenz, Willy
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-20T21:49:19Z
dc.date.available2020-07-20T21:49:19Z
dc.date.issued2020-03-24
dc.identifier.citationTravis S. J. Gabriel et al 2020 ApJ 892 40en_US
dc.identifier.issn0004-637X
dc.identifier.doi10.3847/1538-4357/ab528d
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10150/641911
dc.description.abstractWe develop empirical relationships for the accretion and erosion of colliding gravity-dominated bodies of various compositions under conditions expected in late-stage solar system formation. These are fast, easily coded relationships based on a large database of smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of collisions between bodies of different compositions, including those that are water rich. The accuracy of these relations is also comparable to the deviations of results between different SPH codes and initial thermal/rotational conditions. We illustrate the paucity of disruptive collisions between major bodies, as compared to collisions between less massive planetesimals in late-stage planet formation, and thus focus on more probable, low-velocity collisions, though our relations remain relevant to disruptive collisions as well. We also pay particular attention to the transition zone between merging collisions and those where the impactor does not merge with the target, but continues downrange, a "hit-and-run" collision. We find that hit-and-run collisions likely occur more often in density-stratified bodies and across a wider range of impact angles than suggested by the most commonly used analytic approximation. We also identify a possible transitional zone in gravity-dominated collisions where larger bodies may undergo more disruptive collisions when the impact velocity exceeds the sound speed, though understanding this transition warrants further study. Our results are contrary to the commonly assumed invariance of total mass (scale), density structure, and material composition on the largest remnants of giant impacts. We provide an algorithm for adopting our model into N-body planet formation simulations, so that the mass of growing planets and debris can be tracked.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherIOP PUBLISHING LTDen_US
dc.rightsCopyright © 2020. The American Astronomical Society. Original content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence.en_US
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
dc.subjectImpact phenomenaen_US
dc.subjectPlanetary scienceen_US
dc.subjectPlanet formationen_US
dc.subjectHydrodynamicsen_US
dc.subjectHydrodynamical simulationsen_US
dc.subjectInner planetsen_US
dc.titleGravity-dominated Collisions: A Model for the Largest Remnant Masses with Treatment for “Hit and Run” and Density Stratificationen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.contributor.departmentUniv Arizona, Lunar & Planetary Insten_US
dc.identifier.journalASTROPHYSICAL JOURNALen_US
dc.description.noteOpen access articleen_US
dc.description.collectioninformationThis item from the UA Faculty Publications collection is made available by the University of Arizona with support from the University of Arizona Libraries. If you have questions, please contact us at repository@u.library.arizona.edu.en_US
dc.eprint.versionFinal published versionen_US
dc.source.journaltitleThe Astrophysical Journal
dc.source.volume892
dc.source.issue1
dc.source.beginpage40
refterms.dateFOA2020-07-20T21:49:20Z


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Copyright © 2020. The American Astronomical Society. Original content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright © 2020. The American Astronomical Society. Original content from this work may be used under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 licence.